Compare And Contrast The Radical Enlightenment Of Religion

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The radical Enlightenment understanding of religion is the belief that religion in general is harmful for society and that it shouldn’t exist. This belief is shared by people who think that religion should be substituted with a rationale belief system, one that can be reasoned with (Kant, Spinoza, Hume, and Reimarus). Hume, Kant, Spinoza, and Reimarus viewed religion negatively in general and especially disagreed with Christianity. Reimarus believed that the system of religion was actually made and based off of lies and dishonesty. Similarly, Kant thought that religion was just a superstition and held no interest in it. They also believed in complete equality in the sense that everything should be completely fair rather than decided upon at…show more content…
He believed that religion should not be a matter of thinking or concepts, it should be about feelings and our love and devotion to God. Schleiermacher thought that it doesn’t matter about the complications of how our devotion to God came to be, just that God does exist and we do love and worship him. His views contrast with the radical Enlightenment because Schleiermacher believed that no matter what happens, faith will persist and continue to exist because it isn’t based around logic but feelings. However, even though he did feel this way, he perceived that the radical Enlightenment posed a threat to the very basis of religion (Handout #1). Schleiermacher saw religion positively since he viewed it as being more emotional and sensory which would not be agreed upon by Kant. He believed that it is essential to use feelings to find out where humanity meets the spiritual and supernatural which agrees with religion and supports his positive view of religion (Handout #1). He also states that religion should be almost like a second nature to us and that every action we make should be followed by a thought of religion as…show more content…
However, he did realize that no religion would be able to survive just based on the supposed experiences and ‘revelations’ of other people, which is what led him to understanding that it must be based on peoples understanding and personal interpretations of reality (Handout #1). Even though he did feel as though he was indebted to the Enlightenment, Hegel opposed many of its basic concepts even while protecting a lot of the developments that were brought by the Enlightenment (Handout #1). The views of religion that are offered by Hegel lean more positively to Christianity and religion in general since he does agree with the belief of God and he was Lutheran which is a sect of Christianity and also supports his acceptance of religion (Handout #1). He also frequently utilizes Christian terms in his writings, especially those of the Trinity which actually supports religion in general even though he thought that religion should be transformed into philosophy which proves that Hegel inspected and researched religion more as a philosophy which is more harmful to it since philosophies have never been proven. However, Hegel opposes a portion of orthodoxy because he believes that Evil was created by God and that humanity is nothing without the contrast between good and evil. Some of his views are also more harmful for Christianity because he
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