Compare And Contrast The Odyssey And Much Ado About Nothing

906 Words4 Pages
Obviously, men, and women are the most common kinds of people on Earth. There always seems to be a push, and pull, a give and take going on between them–yet, not always a coordinated, positive kind. The fact of the matter is that men and women were made to be imperfect (because we are all human) complements for one another, but as human beings, men and women oftentimes struggle to match up, and see eye to eye. The Odyssey by Homer, and Much Ado about Nothing by William Shakespeare search what makes men and women great for each other, and the struggles that they face in trying to make the best of one another–and the disappointments they encounter from falling short of that task. To begin, The Odyssey subtlety investigates the relationships…show more content…
Benedick and Beatrice are similar to Odysseus and Penelope because they are equals in wit. Practically the entire play demonstrates their wits brings the struggle they create for each other alive. However, one special moment that they share where their wits are used in harmony comes after Hero’s almost-wedding, and public disgrace. Benedick goes to comfort Beatrice, and confides, “I do love nothing in the world so well as you. Is not that strange?” (Shakespeare, pg. 227). After some prodding and some repartee characteristic of their relationship, he gets Beatrice to admit, “I love you with so much of my heart that none is left to protest” (Shakespeare, pg. 229). As mentioned previously in another essay prompt, neither one allowed them self to love the other before they felt certain of the other’s feelings. But, once they let themselves love each other, and open up, they were able to be true, and sincere with one another. Their love is strong enough that upon Beatrice’s request to “Kill Claudio” (Shakespeare, pg. 229), Benedick first refuses this challenge, which pains Beatrice; but, in the end, he agrees to challenge Claudio. Love has a lot of power; whether for good, or for bad. But, the point is that no matter the difficulties, and differences between a man and a woman, they can undertake…show more content…
The Odyssey indirectly illustrates the difficulties, and benefits of men and women’s relationship, and that same topic is a main theme in Much Ado about Nothing. At a glance, these two masterpieces are totally unalike, but clearly they have strong similarities in this universal theme. BYU-Idaho students can benefit from serious study and reflection of these two great works in countless ways; but, in regards to the relationship between men and women, they can help see relationships in a clearer light. The culture that students at BYU-Idaho live with can be hard to manage at times. The LDS culture’s ideas about marriage, and sexual relationships between men and women differ greatly from the world surrounding these students, and students can get lost between the two clashing cultures if they are not careful. From these two great works of art, a student can better understand the reality of commitment to marriage. Marriage takes constant hard work; it can be exhausting because of the continuous tussle between the two sexes. On the other hand, though, these books may also help restore a student’s hope in relationships because of the great rewards such relationships can
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