Compare And Contrast Tell Tale Heart And Tell Tale Heart

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Tell-Tale Heart, written by Edgar Allan Poe, depicts the inner conflict of a murderer as he retells his story of how he came to kill the old man as a means to prove his sanity. The story is told in the point of view of an unreliable narrator, of whom is greatly disturbed by the eye of a geriatric man. The eye in question is described as evil, irritating the narrator beyond his comprehension, to the point when he has no choice but to get rid of the vexation by destroying the eye. This short story is similar to The Black Cat, of which is also penned by Poe. In The Black Cat, the narrator, albeit unreliable, describes his wrongdoings to the reader. He tells his story of how he murdered his wife, killed one of the two cats, and trapped the other…show more content…
In both of these stories, the narrator is described as a murderer, utilizing disturbing ways to torture and kill their victims. In the Tell-Tale Heart, the narrator is vexed by the old man’s eye, of which he compares to that of the eye of a vulture. However, the owner of the eye, an old man that had cared for the narrator since he was a young boy, was not the direct result of the hate. In fact, the narrator states, “I loved the old man. He had never wronged me. He had never given me insult” (1). This proves that the old man was a victim of the anger that blinded the narrator. On the other hand, the husband in The Black Cat, of whom is the narrator, kills his wife and first black cat, Pluto. The death of Pluto was caused through the narrator’s irritation in the fact that he could not have the cat’s former love for him. Originally, Pluto loved the narrator with everything he had, but this was all changed once the narrator carved an eye out of its socket one night when he had come home intoxicated.…show more content…
In Tell-Tale Heart, the narrator is “tortured” in a piercing ringing as he accommodates a group of policemen sent to the old man’s house to investigate. While he is making small talk with the men, a sharp ringing appears, growing louder and louder as time passes. In hopes to rid himself of the noise, the narrator attempts to talk faster, changing the pitch of his voice as time progresses. This is described as follows, “I talked more quickly—more vehemently; but the noise steadily increased” (Tell-Tale Heart 4). However, these attempts were made futile as the ringing never ceased, ultimately prompting the narrator to admit his crime. The noise could be inferred as the manifestation of the guilt the narrator contains for killing the old man, of who was a kindred spirit and had watched over the former. It could also be said that the noise is the beating of his heart, of which the rate of the heartbeat would increase as he becomes more nervous and anxious. Correspondingly, the husband in The Black Cat has the same problem. In addition to the murder of Pluto, the husband attempted to kill to his second cat, of which did not result in the death of the actual cat, but the wife instead as she moved to protect the pet. In his rush to hide the evidence of his murder, the narrator accidentally walls up the living black cat with his wife. Once officers come to investigate the
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