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Compare And Contrast Slavery And Pro-Slavery

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Pro-slavery and anti-slavery were groups of advocates who both had a different perspective about slavery. The group of people that believed in slavery were mainly from the South and they were usually businessmen, traders, farmers, and slave traders. They argued that slavery was right; slavery caused a growth in the nation’s economy, it was accepted in the bible, and the slaves were better taken care of in the hands of a master. On the other hand, the Northerners thought otherwise. On their behalf, they argued that the slaves were treated poorly by their masters, it was a sin to be involved in slavery, and the Africans were unhappy because they were forced to move from their homeland. The pro-slavery authors of the articles gave support to their…show more content…
He also stated that a Northerner gave immigrants low incomes for their hard work although they knew that it was insufficient for their family. The bottom line of the author 's argument was that he believed the South’s labor system was a “recognized moral obligation enters into the contract.” However, the North’s labor system was a “stern demand and supply.” He believed that society was held together by the grip of moral duties. Due to this, the author believed if the slave labor system was much appreciated, the moral standards of Christians would increase. The way the North treated the immigrants was not considered the best way for a Christian to rise its virtues or grow in an economy. The second article called “Southern Press Review” by a Southern pointed out similar statements to the Carolinian, but also stated other issues about the nation. The author talks about the defects of the Government, laws, society, and civilization as his evidence for his argument. The Southern gave examples, such as an innocent human found guilty, that the government has authority to take a family’s home,…show more content…
But corn meal bread, with little or no meat, and no vegetable diet, is extremely hard fare. I am very certain, from an attentive observation to this subject, that a negro deprived of meat diet, is not able to endure the labor that those can perform who are liberally supplied with it; and that the master who gives his field hands half a pound of meat per day, and two quarts of meal, (or something short of this when an allowance of vegetables is made,) is better compensated by slave labor, than those who give the ordinary quantity. Their food should be cooked for them twice a day, and carried out to the field. It is a general custom in this part of the state, to have their food cooked but once a day, and to require each negro to cook for himself at night, and carry with him his food for the morning’s meal in the field. (Web, para