Compare And Contrast Classic Management And Systems Theory

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Classic management and systems theory (Taylor, 1917; Weber, 1947; Senge, 1990) have been used respectively in describing organizational behaviour. They assume a similar perspective in responding to turbulence and change that is often seen in healthcare organizations of today (Ford, 2008). Theories such as classical organizational theory developed by Frederick Taylor in 1917 (Taylor, 1917) to more contemporary theories such as Peter Senge’s systems theory in 1990 (Senge 1990), have examined perspectives regarding change and innovation in organizations. The readiness of organizations and individual practitioners to enter into interprofessional collaborative care teams is an example of organizational change that can help shape innovative health…show more content…
The concept of production first and people second led to declining production and quality and an overall dissatisfaction among workers and near complete loss of organizational pride. The modern day example in healthcare is ‘fee for service’ whereby physicians have been criticized for pushing patients through their clinics at alarming rates so that they can be highly productive and maintain a lucrative business (Allard, Jelovac & Leger,…show more content…
Coexisting factors that are normally conceived of as mutually interdependent create the environment for the individual (Lewin 1951). For example, the individual trust, communication and understanding of what it means to collaborate may have an impact on an individual healthcare practitioners’ ability to work in a traditional multidisciplinary siloed healthcare system with some of his or her colleagues. However, when considered interdependently, these factors may impact how that same practitioner is able to successfully collaborate in an interprofessional team whereby the close interaction and relationship with others coupled with potential overlapping competencies and scopes of practice, are evident. According to Lewin, behaviour results from tensions between an individual’s self-perceptions and the environment encountered (Smith,
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