Code Switching Vs Code Switching

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Language is a universal trait that every culture has, whether it is written or spoken, people around the world have a need to communicate with one another. Language reflects your background and where you come from, according to Fromkin, Rodman & Hyams (2011), an accent is a regional phonological distinction (p. 433). That being said, in the United States the most prevalent language is English, but depending on the region, your language might sound different to other people. If someone from Wisconsin visited one of the southern states, they would definitely notice a drawl in a southerner’s language, whereas the native southerner would think the Wisconsin resident’s accent sounds nasally. Code switching is a popular way of communication for people who fluently speak two languages. According to Carmen Fought, “code switching occurs in bilingual communities all over the world”(p. 2). Code switching happens almost effortlessly in conversation and can seem odd or entertaining to people outside of the conversation or someone who only speaks one language. What people might not understand is that people who use code switching aren 't using broken language, they are actually quite experienced. Fought also says: when two or more languages are used in a community, they tend to “influence each other”…show more content…
She grew up speaking both Spanish and English fluently but I often observed her using code switching with her parents and siblings. Another example is her younger sister, she understands both Spanish and English but never speaks Spanish. Interestingly enough, when her father speaks to her in Spanish, she completely understands it and responds in English. It is very enjoyable to hear them all speak to each other in their own way, using both languages. It would be interesting to see my friend 's family learn the concept of code switching because they just use it naturally without
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