Code Of Ethics In Nursing: The Ethics Of Nursing

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Before Nightingale, nurses were lower class citizens that were alcoholics or prostitutes with no to a little education. Florence Nightingale realized that nurses ought to have some education in caring for others and be of a higher class. In 1860, she opened the first nursing school in London that did not accept prostitutes and alcoholics. To signify Nightingale’s view of nursing, Lystra Gretter composed a Hippocratic Oath for nurses called the Nightingale pledge. I solemnly pledge myself before God and in the presence of this assembly, to pass my life in purity, and to practice my profession faithfully. I will abstain from whatever is deleterious and mischievous, and will not take or knowingly administer any harmful drug. I will do all in…show more content…
In today’s society nursing meets all the requirements of being a profession. To be considered a profession, one has to be dedicated to their career, abide by standards and a code of ethics, and have a higher education and a body of knowledge, duty to provide service, have autonomy and be part of a professional organization. Nurses take the traditional role of caring for loved ones to a whole new level of care. Registered nurses abide by a code of ethics as set forth by the American Nurses Association. Some of the ethics nurses live out are: commitment to the patient, practice with compassion and respect, accountability and responsibility for owns actions and collaborating with other health care providers (Code of Ethics for Nurses, 2015). Nurses practice the code of ethics on a routine basis by employing the six fundamental concepts established by the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN). Nursing provides the best quality of care by exercising six models formulated by QSEN: patient-centered care, teamwork, and collaboration, evidence base practice, quality improvement, safety and informatics (Competencies, n.d.). Following the competencies set forth by QSEN decreases errors and gives patients the care they desire and…show more content…
pg. 19, 2014). The first rule of nursing is to do no harm, but since we are human, errors will happen. Inaccuracies in delivering treatment are due to mistaken identity, falls, burns, nosocomial infections, suicides, death or injuries due to restraints, wrong site surgery, surgical injuries, transfusion errors, adverse drug events and pressure ulcers (Kohn and Donaldson, pg. 35, 2000). Nurses use autonomy to contemplate on where corrections can be made through their daily routine. By knowing where the shortcomings are in delivering treatment, allows for errors to be corrected and to decrease adverse patient outcomes. Safety is focused on reducing the chance of harm to staff and patients. The 2016 National Patient Safety Goals for Hospitals includes criteria such as using two forms of identification when caring for a patient to ensure the right patient is being treated, proper hand washing techniques to prevent nosocomial infections and reporting critical information promptly (Joint Commission, 2015). It is important that nurses follow standards and protocols intending to patients to decrease adverse
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