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Climate Weather And Meteorology Essay

comparative Essay
1015 words
1015 words
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Anna Grinde Professor Harris ATM SCI 100 6 December 2015 Explain the difference between climate, weather, and meteorology Climate, weather, and meteorology are 3 words that seem to be the same but in reality differ significantly. Two of these concepts pertain to the atmosphere but differ in what time and place they are studied in, and the last one is studying these concepts. The textbook definition of climate is the condition of the atmosphere in a specific region over many years. It has to do with long-term averages of temperature, winds, clouds, pressure, moisture, precipitation, etc. For example, South America has a very tropical climate while Minnesota has hot summers and cold winters experiencing the widest variety of weather. Furthermore, weather is conditions that occurred very recently or are currently happening at a particular location. For example, people might say, “The sky is really clearing up!” or maybe, “It snowed 6 inches last night.” The current temperature, dew-point, relative humidity, cloud cover, and precipitation all have to do with the weather. The fundamental cause of weather is the effect of the Sun and the Earth due to the fact that …show more content…

In this essay, the author

  • Explains the difference between climate, weather, and meteorology. the textbook definition of climate is the condition of the atmosphere in a specific region over many years.
  • Explains that weather is conditions that occurred very recently or are currently happening at a particular location.
  • Explains meteorology is the scientific study of the climate and the weather. it can be complicated but has many tools to assist in predicting atmospheric changes.
  • Concludes that climate, weather, and meteorology all differ in their exact definitions, but it is no surprise that sometimes people mix up these terms. all three help us understand the science behind weather forecasts and global warming predictions.
  • Explains that thunderstorms occur when the air is unstable and a relatively cold front overruns relatively warm air at the surface.
  • Explains that a cell is the building block of thunderstorms, while multicell and supercells are responsible for the severe ones.
  • Explains that squall lines, which is a classic mesoscale convective system, are composed of intense, individual cells arranged in the line. supercells cause severe and dangerous weather due to the environment in which the storm forms.
  • Concludes that thunderstorms are common but the severe ones need specific conditions and cells to take place. ordinary cell storms occur much more often and last for much less time.
  • Explains that air mass is a large body of air whose properties of temperature and moisture content are similar in any horizontal direction.
  • Explains that there are four different types of air masses: polar (cold), tropical (warm), maritime (moist), and continental (dry).
  • Explains continental polar, continental tropical, and maritime tropical air mass.

An ordinary-single cell is the most common, but multicell and supercells are responsible for the severe thunderstorms. The ordinary single-cell thunderstorms are short lived with three stages: the cumulus, the mature, and the dissipating stages. In the last stage, it eliminates the upward supply of high humidity air needed to maintain a thunderstorm. On the other hand, multicell storms are composed of severe individual single-cell storms that can make storms last for several hours. There is dense, cold air of the downdraft that forms the gust front which forms new cells. Then, groups of these thunderstorms tend to join into larger systems referred to as mesoscale convective

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