Classism In The Necklace

1310 Words6 Pages
Ladies, stop giving the 78 cents back. Women fought for their individuality with the intention for equality. Women are used for the consumption of all sorts, either for property or to sell beauty. Society inflicts detrimental ideals upon women, resulting in mental and physical trauma. In "The Necklace", Madame Loisel is described as a beauteous woman who was cheated out of the potential life she should have had, because of the fact that she was beautiful yet not part of the higher class. She is unable to be satisfied with the life she has and is constantly coveting for luxurious items. Although Madame Loisel is materialistic or ungrateful, her obsession over her appearance is re-enforced by society, making her a victim of a culture that glorifies…show more content…
Class is defined by income, education, and occupation according to psychologist (Lui & Ali, 159). Madame Loisel spends most of her life wallowing in self pity because she is not rich. Although she is beautiful, Madame Loisel 's importance is minimized due to her lack of wealth. In the beginning of the story, her situation of being born into a family of clerks, or the working class, is even referred to as a "mistake of destiny" (Maupassant, 1). Women in European class systems where a mans accessory and were dependent on men to take care of them. Women weren 't allowed to go to school and could never make a name for themselves (Hughes). A woman 's aspiration, and all she was good for, was to get married to a rich or notable man. Madame Loisel however had to settle for an average, middle class man due to her social worth. She lived being constantly irritated by her modest environment, yearning for fancy dishes, and wishing she could be in a position to be envied. The husband is spineless and Madame Loisel may not be appreciated by all readers due to her character…show more content…
Upon attending the ball, she would have to come as either an upper class guest or a middle class guest. And after all, she wanted nothing more than "to be envied, to be charming, to be sought after" (Maupassant, 1). To arrive simply as a person of the working class and to receive no attention would have been deeply agonizing for Madame Loisel. In order to be presentable for the ball she pushes herself and her husband into an uncomfortable financial state, for the sake of appearing like she fits in with the higher class. The couple spent their saving of four hundred francs, which was initially saved with the intention of buying the husband 's gun so he could shoot with his friends, for Madame Loisel 's new dress (Maupassant, 2). Once the dress is obtained, she was in need of jewels or accessories. She expresses once again how devastating it would be for her to look poor amongst rich women. Madame Loisel and her husband reach a compromise and she agrees to borrow a something from her rich friend. Her friend, Mine. Forestier is willing to help Madame Loisel with her distress and offers her an assortment of jewelry to choose from (Maupassant, 2). After going through all the choices, she decides on the diamond necklace, seeming to be the most expensive. She does "unnecessary" things in an attempt to prove her
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