Chronicles Of Narnia Analysis

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Many people believe that Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe’s storyline and plot are based off of a Christian-based allegory; however, it is not. With the early childhood and teenage years of C.S. Lewis, the author of Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, the story could be a reflection of his life. Lewis also had a fascination with mythology, which plays a key role in the making of the characters. Many think that Lewis’s Christian conversion is what inspired him to write Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe. Without the Christian conversion of C.S. Lewis, Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe’s content would not change but the focus on the meaning would change from a Christian allegory to a children’s fantasy novel. The first fact that would support this theory is Lewis’s childhood. Lewis did not live the life of the average boy; creating interests in cars, wrestling figures, super heroes, action figures, water guns, sports, and mud. He had an imaginary land called Boxen. This land was filled with many “Edwardian” creatures. He would visit and play in this land all the time, but he stopped playing in his land when he was ten because his mother passed away. After this, he was sent to a boarding school in England; twice. While he was at boarding shool, he stayed with a professor named Kirk Patrick. Also, he started exploring the world of poetry, specifically Virgil and Homer, and incorporated his first idea for the Chronicles of Narnia series: a faun carrying parcels in a snowy wood. “From the waist upwards he was like a man, but his legs were shaped like a goat’s(the hair on them was glossy black) and instead of feet he had goats hoofs... ... middle of paper ... ...o who would die for another person. Aslan was made to resemble Jesus, but Aslan was one of the last characters to be added into the novel. “He'll be coming and going" he had said. "One day you'll see him and another you won't. He doesn't like being tied down--and of course he has other countries to attend to. It's quite all right. He'll often drop in. Only you mustn't press him. He's wild, you know. Not like a tame lion” (Lewis,C.S.). C.S. Lewis wrote the novel, but the general public made the novel. The public transformed a well crafted children’s fantasy into a bible for children. For this reason and many more previously stated is why Without the Christian conversion of C.S. Lewis, Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe’s content would not change but the focus on the meaning would change from a Christian allegory to a children’s fantasy novel.
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