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Chronic Condition by Jeffrey Simpson

analytical Essay
1484 words
1484 words
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Jeffrey Simpson’s book, Chronic Condition, is divided into two halves, the first half gives an informative history of Canada’s health care system, chronicling the challenges and problems it has faced to become what we know of today, which I found more compelling than the second. The second half of the book, argues Canada’s need to modernize its health care system. Simpson believes this can be done in four ways: by severely cutting health care spending, by increasing taxes, by incorporating privatization, and or by garnering savings by increasing efficiency. Yet with Canadian politics, politicians are hesitant to make any serious debate over health care because they know it is akin to the end of their political career to even suggest these things to the public. However, privately they become increasingly aware that at the rate health care system costs are skyrocketing, it is simply not efficient or effective with concerns to Canada’s aging population. Cost associated with Canada’s current health care system is growing faster than the revenues coming into the government. In many ways, Simpson speaks the hard truth, yet in other areas I find he is off base with his thoughts. I find that people will either extremely agree, disagree, or simply stand in the middle not leaning either way, like I. Like many others I found that Simpson takes far too long to make his point and tends to constantly repeat his argument too many times. Throughout the book he identifies what he thinks are key problems with the current health care system, which includes but not limited to: its failure to achieve the appropriate quality of care, given the increasing amount of government money being funnelled into it. Which I would say is very much true. Canada ... ... middle of paper ... ...n the end, whether Canadians want to believe it or not, we are paying for the Cadillac, but getting the Chevrolet (Simpson 2012, p.8). As a society, Canada needs to grow a backbone and not cower from the idea of reforming the current health care system. Reform is needed and this book gave a good outline of its history and Simpson’s answers are at times I find completely off-base, yet others provide a good start. It may not be the huge change many idealist are waiting for, but it is a start and that is what Canadians need a good start to get the ball rolling. Simpson does what many politicians and people in general are afraid to do, publicly criticize the system and give the sometimes harsh solutions that people do not want to hear. Be it raising taxes or losing some of the self-proclaimed identity gained from the unique but evidently not working health care system.

In this essay, the author

  • Analyzes jeffrey simpson's book, chronic condition, which is divided into two halves. the first half chronicles the challenges and problems of the health care system, while the second half argues for modernizing the system.
  • Opines that simpson speaks the hard truth, yet in other areas he is off base with his thoughts. simpson takes too long to make his point and repeats his argument too many times.
  • Analyzes how simpson identifies key problems with the current health care system, including its failure to achieve the appropriate quality of care, given the increasing amount of government money funnelled into it.
  • Analyzes simpson's argument that doctor salaries and hospital administration are generous, considering they are part of the public sector.
  • Argues that simpson feels that the biggest problem is that much of the canadian public sees the health care system as "iconic" because it is an essential aspect of canada's identity.
  • Agrees with simpson's argument that hospitals have long wait times because of the lack of space and resources, but the underlying problem is the demographic of people using these facilities.
  • Explains simpson's strong case for public-funded services provided by private health care deliverers, arguing that this does not contradict the "spirit" of the canada health act and would potentially introduce competition in a system controlled by the public service unions.
  • Analyzes how simpson's argument about making a profit from medicare brings us back to the idea of being too mych like the states.
  • Analyzes how simpson goes on a tangent complaining that the health care system reform is severely hampered by politicians, yet he himself focused on the benefits of having private option for joint replacement surgery.
  • Opines that simpson's portrayal of doctors and nurses in chapter 15 makes his analysis poor and grossly exaggerated. the disparity between the two is overwhelming.
  • Opines that the book provoking discussion about canada's health care system and the need for reform was the main goal of this book.
  • Opines that canada needs to grow a backbone and not cower from the idea of reforming the current health care system.
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