Cassandra as a Tragic Figure

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Cassandra as a Tragic Figure Cassandra is a tragic figure in Agamemnon. She is destroyed by a web of circumstances beyond her control, but not beyond her awareness. Cassandra has full knowledge of what is going to happen, yet she cannot change the tragic events. Cassandra’s tragic role is Agamemnon is best filled in three instances: as Cassandra is getting out of the chariot, during her dialogue with the leader of the chorus when she reveals her prophecy, and as she is approaching the doors to face her death. Cassandra is waiting in the chariot and the leader of the chorus persuades her to come out of the chariot. Cassandra is very hesitant to get out of the chariot because she knows what is about to happen: “God of the long road, Apollo Apollo my destroyer-you destroy me once, destroy me twice-“(145.1078.1080) Cassandra has already been destroyed by having true prophecy that no one will believe and once again she knows she is going to be destroyed by murder. Cassandra begins to have dialogue with the Leader of the chorus. The Leader does not understand what is being said so Cassandra finally says, “Agamemnon, you will see him dead.”(153.1259) At this point this Leader says, “Peace, poor girl! Put those words to sleep.”(153.1260) The Leader thinks that she is just imaging things and that what she says is not possible. Cassandra cannot do a thing to stop what is about to happen, yet she is completely aware of what is going to happen. Towards the end, Cassandra walks toward the doors of the house to face her fate. She realizes that there is nothing left that she can do: “Well, I must go in now, mourning Agamemnon’s death and mine. Enough of life!”(157.1335.1337) Cassandra knows her death is closer now than ever before, but she does not try to fight it. She has no control over what happens. Cassandra is a tragic figure in Agamemnon who is destroyed by a web of circumstances beyond her control, but not beyond her
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