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C. S. Lewis’ Symbolism, Development and Morality in The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe

Powerful Essays
In The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, C.S. Lewis employs symbolism, development and morality. He uses symbolism as a driving force throughout the novel. Without the use of characters similar to Christian figures, Lewis’ series would lack a sense of meaning. His use of these figures evokes a sense of wonder in the reader and encourages them to continue reading. Lewis uses development throughout The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe as a means to create vivid and more impressionable world. He uses morality as a means for rallying the reader behind a character, inspiring them to continue to support them though the story. These three elements work harmoniously to establish a novel that contains literary depth and meaning.
In all novels, symbolism is a key element that authors use to heighten the literary merit of their writing. In The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, C.S. Lewis uses symbolism as a driving force throughout the series. Without the use of characters similar to Christian figures, Lewis’ series would lack deep literary meaning. The wide variety of symbols and literary devices used in these books successfully evoke deep thought and inspires readers to analyze the work further.
Lewis uses many different forms of symbolism throughout The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe. In this story there is a character named Aslan. Aslan is a lion whose purpose in the novel is to serve as an allusion for Christ. Aslan and Christ share many traits; they are both self-sacrificing and compassionate individuals (Dunham). Not only are these two figures characteristics similar, their actions are also parallel. Edmund, one of the four children in The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, betrays his siblings and allies himself w...

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