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Biography of Robert Frost: The Road Not Taken

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Robert Frost is a well know American poet born in San Francisco on March 26, 1874. Robert's father, William Prescott Frost Jr., a Harvard educated man, who decides to bring his wife and children to California in order to pursue a dream in politics and journalism (Kerly). Robert's father dies of tuberculosis in 1885. Soon after the death of his father, Robert and his mother, Isabelle, move to Derry, New Hampshire where Frost and his family live in a barn from 1900 to 1909 (Kerly). Robert graduates as class poet and co-valedictorian from Lawrence High School in Massachusetts. He then attends Dartmouth University for a semester but drops out to take classes at Harvard University but does not get a degree (Kerly). After reading Robert's poem's, one may see his writing style as being far from simple, his literature being full of symbolic meanings, a great deal of imagery, and unique writing patterns that many easily understand and relate to. As a result, he receives many awards.

Several of his books of verse won a Pulitzer Prize: New Hampshire: A Poem With Notes and Grace Notes; A Further Range; A Witness Tree; and Collected Poems. Amy Lowell, an American poet and critic to whom Frost turned for support and favor early in his career,2 called him "one of the most intuitive" poets of the day3 and noted that "[h]e sees much, . . . both into the hearts of persons, and into the qualities of scenes. (March)

Robert Frost is popular because of his ability to capture imagination and consciousness in his poetry (Michael). There are plenty of poems Frost wrote that express this, such as: Range-Finding, A Cliff Dwelling, and The Road Not Taken. The Road Not Taken, is considered one of his most symbolic poems. The two pathways in the yell...

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...wice': Robert Frost and the Aesthetics of Apocalypse." Thought 67, no. 264 (March 1992): 31–46. Quoted as "'If It Had to Perish Twice': Robert Frost and the Aesthetics of Apocalypse" in Bloom, Harold, ed. Robert Frost, New Edition, Bloom's Modern Critical Views. New York: Chelsea House Publishing, 2010. Bloom's Literature. Facts On File, Inc. Web. 1 May 2014

Bagby, George F. "'Assorted Characters'." Frost and the Book of Nature(University of Tennessee Press, 1993): pp. 1–20, 199–200. Quoted as "'Assorted Characters'" in Bloom, Harold, ed. Robert Frost, New Edition, Bloom's Modern Critical Views. New York: Chelsea House Publishing, 2010. Bloom's Literature. Facts On File, Inc. Web. 1 May 2014

William Stafford, "The Terror in Robert Frost," New York Times, 18 August 1974, http://www.nytimes.com/books/99/04/25/specials/frost-terror.html, Accessed 16 June 2009.