Binary Model Essay

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Lev’s Non-binary Fluid Model Based on her 2004 book Transgender Emergence: Therapeutic Guidelines for Working with Gender-variant People and Their Families, Arlene Istar Lev developed two models to describe sex, gender identity, and sexual orientation. The first is a binary model. According to Patton et al. (2016), in this binary system “sex, gender identity, gender role (the enactment of gender), and sexual orientation are assumed to align and lead to the next” (p. 176). As Lev (2004) states in her book, the binary model assumes that “if a person is a male, he is a man; if a person is a man, he is masculine; if a person is a masculine male man, he will be attracted to a feminine female woman; if a person is female, she is a woman;…show more content…
The RMMDI is based on the fundamental concept of intersectionality, or the theory that multiple social identities (e.g. race, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, etc.) interact to shape the lived experience of social issues, especially marginalization and oppression (Crenshaw, 1991). The RMMDI helps to illuminate the intersectional nature of the effects of the graffiti incident, as well as the advantages of using an intersectional approach for creating the case resolution. In the RMMDI, individuals hold self-perceptions of their own identities (e.g. race, gender, sexual orientation, etc.) that influence their cognitive appraisal of the self; in essence, these self-perceptions help individuals answer the critical question of “Who am I?” that is necessary for the development of self-authorship (Baxter Magolda, 2001, as cited in Patton, et al., 2016). Individuals also use their self-perceptions of their multiple identities to craft identity constructs and identity expressions. The characters who were emotionally and psychologically affected by the graffiti hold various racial, gender, sexual orientation, and national identities, and express these identities…show more content…
(2007, as cited in Patton et al., 2016) state that contextual influences affect self-perceptions of multiple identities, but not without first passing through a meaning-making filter. In applying the RMMDI to the incident at SPCC, the contextual influences include the actual incident of hate graffiti, along with pre-existing structures such as campus climate and peer/faculty support. How students process the graffiti incident relies on the meaning-making filter within the RMMDI, which ultimately dictates how contextual influences will affect one’s perception of their
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