Big Data Case Study

1865 Words8 Pages
The Human and Ethical Aspects of Big Data, quickly outlines an array of ethical problems that big data has had and will continue to develop in the upcoming years in our society. The author begins by giving an example of the earliest use of big data, the census. Census data can provide a plethora of benefits to society, representation in government, civil planning, such as road and water treatment, as these take years to construct and having the population and these necessities, Time align is crucial. As the author, uses the example of the internment of Japanese-Americans in 1943. Here is big-data supposed to help the citizens of the Unites States, the big data that is supposed to be private. Now in 1943, big data being used to discriminate…show more content…
I believe observations were very accurate, but from my experience as a teacher, what she indicated is becoming the norm. She mentions that students who came in for extra credit were very enthusiastic, but the following year when students were required to participate, the enthusiasm had waned, to the point that some students did not participate. I will bite my tongue, in regards to students not participating in ‘fun’ educational programs. Teachers and faculty spend countless hours in developing material to engage students, and the best courtesy that some of these students can offer is apathy. I will get off my soapbox now…Whew! To conclude, the paper’s primary aim is to help library instruction, but its use would work for most any discipline. Again, to recant, the author and I included believe that integrating games into instruction can have positive outcome sometimes strong outcomes. The current thought is if one says game and education, one will probably think of digital game. In addition, the thrust of the argument is a game can simplistic and non-digital to be an effective tool for…show more content…
The author appear to be moderately perplexed by the fact that American state that they are concerned about privacy but they yet disclose personal information to entities. I would offer that the reason many are disclosing the information, is that business will not offer their services or product without the personal information. One can go to another vendor for service, only to have the same problem repeated. Now what is perplexing, is the authors claim that “a significant number, 11%” (Caftori & Teicher, 2002) of the population believes that corporate owners should go to prison for violations of information privacy. I must say, I never thought of 11% of a population as a significant percentage, but I am just a student. More confusion for the authors is when a computer system that handles big data has faulty output. They use the analogy of an airline, and if they lose your luggage and should receive compensation, but this is not the case when the DMV provides faulty data. This should not be perplexing, with the airline an explicit contract is made with the purchase of the ticket. The airline is transport my body and my luggage to the agreed location without damage or loss. Luggage is tangible. The contents are worth x amount of dollars and the airline pays the individual
Open Document