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Benefits and Hazards of Immunizations

narrative Essay
1202 words
1202 words
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Benefits and Hazards of Immunizations

Although science and technology have been very beneficial to us a lot of people are misinformed about its procedures. I myself am a bit fearful about how technologically advanced we're getting in such a short period of time, but this is because I don't understand science. I guess most people that fear science feel that way because of the horrible things that science may bring about. When reading Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein" one begins to wonder what if scientists do create a monster and like Dr. Frankenstein did, can no longer undo the creation. It is actually a very scary thought. But then on the other end of the spectrum you have J. Michael Bishop who defends scientists against people's critiques. Bishop is correct in his argument that scientists have done great things. According to him, people begin to lose faith in science because they don't see results as fast as they would like to but as Bishop states research may take years and even then, there may not be a concrete answer. The important thing is that they are working towards one and people should not expect miracles, they should allow scientists to do their work and only hope for a quick solution.

When dealing with a situation of whether science has benefited or troubled the population we can talk about immunizations. Immunizations have saved many children's lives. The epidemic of polio is hardly heard of thanks to immunizations. Measles and chicken pox don't affect children half as much if they've had the immunizations either. So one can say that immunizations have been a benefit to the population because most, if not all, children in the United States have gotten the required vaccines and nearly all of them go away from the...

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...ants everybody to get the vaccine, because as statistics show, the majority of the children are perfectly fine after immunizations. The problems that are arising with vaccines shouldn't be blamed on scientists, for they've come up with a solution to the mentioned illnesses. The problem may be in the way doctors are combining vaccines, or implementing them.

Works Cited

Bishop, J. Michael. "Enemies of Promise." The Presence of Others 3rd edition.

Bedford/St. Martins, New York. (2000) : 237-243. Shelley, Mary. "Frankenstein." The Presence of Others 3rd edition. Bedford/St. Martins, New York. (2000) : 231-236.

Schumacher, Karin. "Autism & Vaccines: A New Look At An Old Story." (2001). http://www.909shot.com/NVICSpecialReport.htm. (19 May 2001). Schumacher, Karin.

"Diabetes Following MMR Shots." (2001). http://www.909shot.com/dicasee.htm. (19 May 2001).

In this essay, the author

  • Opines that people are misinformed about the benefits and hazards of vaccinations because they don't understand science. mary shelley's "frankenstein" makes one wonder what if scientists create a monster.
  • Opines that immunizations have saved many children's lives. measles and chicken pox don't affect children half as much if they've had the vaccines.
  • Narrates how their 15-month-old daughter received her first mmr vaccine at a routine well-baby check-up and was diagnosed with type i diabetes.
  • Narrates how their 11-year-old daughter was re-vaccinated for rubella and measles and was admitted to the hospital with the diagnosis of juvenile diabetes mellitus.
  • Narrates the story of a california mom whose son, garrett, got his mmr vaccination when he was 13 months old and began exhibiting autistic behavior.
  • Opines that vaccines shouldn't be blamed on scientists who have come up with a solution to the mentioned illnesses.
  • Cites bishop, j. michael, shelley, mary, and schumacher, karin. "enemies of promise." the presence of others 3rd edition.
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