Beethoven's Life And Life Of Ludwig Van Beethoven

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Ludwig Van Beethoven also known as Beethoven was an extraordinary composer known by many. Beethoven was born around December 16, 1770 and died March 26, 1887. In his fifty seven years of life he was able to become a famous composer of classical music. His life may not have been long in our standards, but he had career highlights, music compositions, personal life, and his death. Beethoven had accomplished many achievements in his life, but some of his career highlights were what made him so popular. In the article Ludwig Van Beethoven Biography by Biography.com Editors, they wrote that Beethoven’s first break was when he dropped out of school at age fourteen year 1784, and got a job as an Assistant Court Organist. By the year 1787 the court…show more content…
In the book Beethoven His life & Music by Jeremy Siepmann, he talks about Beethoven’s childhood and how his father saw something extraordinary in Beethoven. Siepmann says he was “ruthlessly set about trying to produce a second Mozart” (5). Not only was his father trying to make him perfect he also made it to where when visitors would come over they would see Beethoven crying at the piano. Not only that he was also locked in the cellar and/or not given food (Siepmann 5). At the age of eight his father organized a concert in Cologne for him and Johanna Averdonk which ended up being a failure and Beethoven was blamed for this. After this happened in the progress of five years he also learned piano, harpsichord, violin, viola, organ and horn (Siepmann 5). Beethoven’s life as a child is not known to many people which is why it’s included in many of his biographies because it shows the frustrations that Beethoven had to…show more content…
In the book Diagnosing the Life & Death of Beethoven Genius by Francois Martin Mai, he writes of Beethoven’s medical issues. This book interested me because I am studying to go into the medical field and I thought it would be especially exquisite to write and learn of Beethoven’s medical history and how he was able to still compose music. Mai writes that Beethoven suffered from becoming deaf, gastrointestinal and psychiatric symptoms, respiratory, rheumatologic, and ophthalmologic symptoms (103). Now let’s explain some of these bigger unknown words that Mai says he has. Gastrointestinal means that he had issues with his stomach and/or his intestines. Psychiatric symptoms means that he had some sort of mental illness. Respiratory means he had either trouble breathing or had something wrong with his lungs. Rheumatologic is usually an autoimmune, inflammatory disease. Finally ophthalmologic symptoms means he had something wrong with his eyes. Mai found all of these symptoms from, “his own letters, letters written by others, the Conversation Books, reports (including an autopsy report) written by his physicians, and a modern-day toxicological analysis of his hair” (103). Mai found in his letters that during the winter months he was sick a lot and had minimal chances of getting better but in the summer months he was more
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