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Barbarous Retribution and Revenge

Good Essays
Edgar Allan Poe’s stories are credited for having horror-filled endings. Usually darkness is considered to be a good representative of evil, so the setting in “The Cask of Amontillado” is at night-time. This story deals with the jealousy, revenge and, more importantly, wounded family honor. A man named Montresor, whose name is not discovered till the end of story, is seeking vengeance on Fortunato, who has irreparably insulted him. The very first sentence: “THE thousand injuries of Fortunato I had borne as I best could, but when he ventured upon insult, I vowed revenge”, supports the theme of revenge (Poe 161). This theme also suggests that Fortunato had aggrieved Montresor thousands of times, but whenever he insults Montresor and his family, he decides that there needs to be avenge and, which is the murder of a Fortunato. Montresor believes “he is out to get justice by baiting Fortunato” (Whatley 56). Hence, Whatley states “there is no remorse in Montresor’s heart when he finally confesses after fifty years”. So, for the sake of his family honor and self-respect, he vowed to take revenge by killing Fortunato.
Pride and jealousy are the motivational forces that drive revenge. These forces lead to self-destruction. Both the characters seem to be proud and prosperous. Montresor is jealous of Fortunato and tries to make him foolish as he says, “The man wore motley. He had on a tight- fitting parti- striped dress and his head was surmounted by the conical cap and bells” (Poe 161). Montresor is aware that Fortunato considers himself a connoisseur of wine. Still he talks about Luchesi, another expert on confirming fino[true] Amontillado’s authenticity, as an alternative which urges Fortunato to keep moving towards the dark and nitre-f...

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...Baraban, Elena V. "The Motive For Murder In ‘The Cask Of Amontillado’ By Edgar Allan Poe." Rocky Mountain Review Of Language & Literature 58.2 (2004): 47-62.
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Nevi, Charles N. "Irony and ‘The Cask of Amontillado’.” The English Journal 56.3 (Mar 1967): 461-465. Literary Reference Center. Web. 11 May 2014.
Poe, Edgar Allan. “The Cask of Amontillado.” The Norton Introduction to Literature. 10th ed. Ed. Alison Booth and Kelly J. Mays. New York: W.W. Norton, 2010. 161-165. Print.
Whatley, Rehana. "CONFESSION WITHIN A CONFESSION: POE’S BRAVE NEW WORLD IN ‘THE CASK OF AMONTILLADO’.” JOURNAL OF GLOBAL INTELLIGENCE & POLICY 5.7 (2012): 56-59. Literary Reference Center. Web. 11 May 2014.
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