Asking For A Job Applicant's Facebook Password: Fair Game By Alfred Edmond Jr.

718 Words3 Pages
If you were asked for your Facebook password, what would you say or do? Job applicants cringe to the idea of sharing their social media activity history with their potential employers. However, is it really as bad of a breach in privacy than people think? Does the right to privacy mean anything shared online should be kept confidential? Interestingly, just as applicants have the right to say no to this query, employers have the right to ask. To some employers, the benefits of surveilling potential job candidates’ Facebook activities outweigh the concerns for personal ‘online’ space. Employers must be allowed to ask for Facebook passwords when deemed necessary in order to not only hire the best candidate for the job, but also to protect children…show more content…
Interviews are greatly suited for sizing up your potential employee and making difficult decisions on who to reel in. Unfortunately, what you see now can change shape outside of the office. Employers should be able to ask for a potential employee’s Facebook password. As stated in the essay Why Asking for a Job Applicant’s Facebook Password is Fair Game by Alfred Edmond Jr., it is deemed important and necessary to know every single possible detail about an applicant in order to make the best hire (133). This is a great point because although an applicant may seem to be a great fit now, he may end up causing an unforeseen problem in the future. People lie all of the time, unfortunately. The common idea of interviews is simple: conform to what your employers need, say what they want to hear, and dress professionally. Life is different out of the workplace. If employers knew how applicants behaved outside of the work environment, they could find well-esteemed candidates with the ability to get the job done right with good…show more content…
People have the tendency to believe everything and anything that is posted online should be private. They don’t realize that what they post or send over a platform like Facebook isn’t exactly complete privacy. As Alfred Edomnd Jr. said in his essay Why Asking for a Job Applicant’s Facebook Password is Fair Game, “… don’t think business vs. personal. Think public vs. private. And if something is truly private, do not share it on social media out of a misplaced faith in the expectation of privacy (134).” Just as employees have the right to say no to this request, employers have the right to ask. Employers only want the best for everyone and that is why they need Facebook access to who they deem a potential problem. Asking is fair
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