Aristotle Happiness Essay

2001 Words9 Pages
Teleology can be defined as the search for the end goal, or ultimate purpose of an action. In order to propose the idea that there is an “end goal” in human life, or a further purpose to life, Aristotle introduces teleology. By understanding an action, the end goal can be determined. Aristotle then brings forth the idea that life would be “fruitless” without fulfillment, and that happiness is therefore the end. Aristotle defines happiness as general well-being, or human flourishing. He arrives at this definition by determining that there must be a result , or further purpose to of actions, otherwise life would be fruitless. Aristotle states that happiness as the a chief good is meaningless, and a better definition is needed for the chief…show more content…
In other words, I experienced happiness as an emotion that would come and go, depending on the situation that just occurred.Interestingly enough, since I viewed it as an emotion, I could describe it as a biological response to a certain action, with rapid influx of dopamine and serotonin into neural pathways, eliciting a euphoria like being high on a drug. I have never been high before, but the sensation of euphoria associated with happiness can be most associated with an elevated state of being, kind of like those who get high frequently, describe it as. Anyways, after studying Aristotle happiness, my ideas regarding happiness were definitely modified. I believe now that happiness is the accumulation of all the moments of euphoria in my life, and these are all the precious moments experienced in life that I will reflect on, and assess how ripe the fruit symbolic to my life has become. My actions that led to certain outcomes, will determine my overall happiness from life. When considering happiness in life, it is important to consider all of the happy moments, as a whole, rather than just individual moments. This methodology is analogous to Aristotle’s for analyzing the end goal of…show more content…
There are five parameters of Marxism that allowed for philosophy, as he saw it. First, human history pre-supposes existence of human beings. This means that man was created by man, and not by anything that was not a man. Second, existence does not mean to live, or have a soul. According to Marx, this meant that living is the practical engagement of producing the means to life. Instead of obtaining biological satisfaction, one has to live and practice a certain trade or category to advance productive human activities, which are continuous over time. These activities are dynamic, and change over time. The needs created from the human activities are dynamic also, changing when necessary. The third premise was that humans produce for more than just themselves, they also produce for others. This premise is relatively straight forward. The fourth premise was the idea that production and reproduction is not only a natural activity, it is a social activity. Human life is always social, and is shown as product of this activity. Another way to put it, the human is a result of its function. The final premise is that humans are conscious. This is the idea that humans are aware of their environment, and how to use it to obtain needs. From this, needs can take a material form, through language. Through speech, humans are able to socialize with one another and show their consciousness with one another. Language brought about the birth of consciousness. In summary, it is important to
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