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Are persons with MPD/Dissociative Identity Disorder responsible for bad actions committed when in an alter state?

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2. Are persons with MPD/Dissociative Identity Disorder responsible for bad actions committed when in an alter state? Why or why not? Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD) Diagnostic criteria dictates that the presence of two or more distinct identities (each with its’ own relatively enduring pattern of perceiving, relating to, and thinking about the environment and self), as well as at least two of these identities recurrently taking control of the person’s behavior coupled with the inability to recall important personal information that is too extensive to be explained by ordinary forgetfulness. The disturbance must also be proved to not be due to direct physiological effects of a substance e.g alcohol or due to a general medical condition e.g complex partial seizures. I will take it upon myself to argue that persons with MPD/Dissociative Identity Disorder should be held responsible for bad actions committed when in an alter state because these alters are not independent selves, but rather parts of a single person. And a person should be held responsible for what a part of them did. If lack of control over past selves( or in this case ‘alters’) removed criminal responsibility, then all criminals would be free. Lack of control over a past self or alter should also not remove criminal responsibility. In simplistic terms, I cannot control what I did yesterday since it is past, and even if I may even be unaware of doing it because I have forgotten, I should still be held accountable. Being forgetful of my actions yesterday and/or unaware of what occurred yesterday does not mean I am not the same person that I was yesterday. Therefore persons with MPD/Dissociative Identity Disorder should be held responsible for bad actions committed... ... middle of paper ... ...t is put to trial but rather their sanity. They are still seen as only part of a person, but what if one part of this person is criminally insane? Thus punishment for bad actions one’s alter has committed may not always be appropriate, in the case of the criminally insane. Thus in conclusion I would like to reinstate my point that persons suffering from MPD/Dissociative Identity Disorder are not separate selves, and are in fact parts of the same person and should be held responsible for bad actions enacted by their alters. = Bibliography: Walter Sinnott-Armstrong and Stephen Behnke ‘Responsibility in Cases of Multiple Personality Disorder,: Nous, vol 34, supplement 14 (2000) , pp.301-23 Jeanette Kennett and Steve Matthews, ‘Identity, Control and Responsibility: The case of Dissociative Identity Disorder, ‘Philosophical Psychology, vol. 15, no.4 (2002), pp. 509-26
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