Are Socretes' Arguments about Death Sound?

577 Words3 Pages
Are Socrates Arguments Sound? Socrates believes one cannot fear what one does not know. He believes since no one has an absolute knowledge of what follows death in the natural world, man should not fear death. He has several arguments to back this up. In this paper I will look at two of his arguments and conclude that his arguments are unsound due to the fact that opinions are not truths. First of all, to prove Socrates' arguments are not sound, one must know what a sound argument is. In a sound argument all of the premises must be true. For example: People under 18 are not eligible to vote; Some students in college are under 18; Therefore, some college students are not eligible to vote. This argument is not only sound but also it is valid. It is sound because both premises are true. One must be 18 to be eligible to vote. Some students in college are not 18 yet, so the conclusion that some college students are not able to vote is valid. Now that it's clear what a sound argument is, I want to take a look at one of Socrates arguments that man should not fear death. Here is the first argument I will look at. No one knows whether death may not be the greatest of all blessings for a man. It is the most blameworthy ignorance to think one knows what one does not know. If one fears death, then one claims to know that death is not the greatest of all blessings for man. Therefore, it is the most blameworthy ignorance to fear death. (Pace) Premise one is sound because it is true. No one can actually know whether death will be the greatest blessings for a man because it is impossible to communicate with the dead to see if it is good or bad. Premise two does not follow what a sound argument is. When S... ... middle of paper ... ... the storeowner would be very grateful to that person. Would the consequence of this action be a greater evil than the act of breaking into a store itself? Again, that is an opinion, because the storeowner in fact could press charges since the person did disobey authorities. After looking at two arguments Socrates made for one shall not fear death I have concluded that neither of his arguments are sound. In each argument there are in fact sound premises but in order for an argument to be completely sound all the premises must in fact be total truths. Socrates believes he is wiser than others and that his opinions are true, but there is no doubt that no one can really prove what Socrates is trying to achieve in his arguments, which is to prove that one shall not fear death. Work Cited Pace, M. (September, 2005). Online posting. Platos Apology. www.chapman.edu

    More about Are Socretes' Arguments about Death Sound?

      Open Document