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Andrew Carnegie's Gospel Of Wealth

analytical Essay
1600 words
1600 words
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Steel production in the United States keeps one name in mind, Andrew Carnegie, the Master of Steel. Carnegie was a self-made business man who went on to become one of the wealthiest men in the nineteenth century. Carnegie possessed something he called his “gospel of wealth.” The methods by which Carnegie gained his wealth is widely criticized. Carnegie also had multiple sneaky business plans as well. The author relates the failure of Carnegie to the failure of America as well. Due to a small percent of the population controlling most of the money it caused many problems not only socially but also economically. The Master of Steel, Andrew Carnegie, was a genius during his time but had many unfortunate repercussions as a result of his actions. …show more content…

In this essay, the author

  • Analyzes how carnegie's "failure" reflects the failure of america in the gilded age by people wanting to make a lasting impression of themselves.
  • Analyzes the social and economic consequences of the homestead strike in 1892. people wanted to be wealthier and therefore went to great lengths to get more money.
  • Explains that andrew carnegie was a mastermind during the gilded age, but he had many disastrous outcomes.
  • Analyzes how carnegie, the master of steel, was a self-made business man who went on to become one of the wealthiest men in the nineteenth century. carnegie possessed something he called his "gospel of wealth."

He gave away ninety percent of his wealth. “How very little the millionaire has beyond the peasant, and how often his additions tend not to happiness but to misery” (page 5). Carnegie said this after a trip to India, which is where he saw first hand the happiness of the people there even though they did not have anything. Carnegie described himself well by stating that one can only be happy based the way they live their life not by what is in it. Sometimes the happiest people in the world are the poorest and the saddest people are the wealthiest. Carnegie shared his wealth with numerous people and therefore most likely made their lives better. Carnegie also valued intelligence more than money. Carnegie saw “Vanderbilt walking on Fifth Avenue, Carnegie he smugly remarked, ‘I would not exchange his millions for my knowledge of Shakespeare’” (page …show more content…

While people with large amounts of money lived lavish lifestyles, the people who had little money lived paycheck to paycheck. If the employees, see the boss living a very lavish lifestyle while they are struggling. This is most likely of the primary reasons of the Homestead strike in 1892. Consequences that were social included strikes, fights, disagreements, and people losing their jobs. People wanted to be wealthier and therefore went to great lengths to get more money. Crimes such as robbery, murder, assault were common and easy ways to receive money. Economic consequences could be felt worldwide. Numerous times when the United States of America was bailed out of debt by wealth Americans, some of them did this multiple times. A person can greatly affect the economic status of a country, area, or region by simply doing one thing. Creating more product. In order to create more product, most of the time more jobs are needed and therefore it will boost the economy. The social consequences could be looked upon as more social disagreements and more crime and economic consequences could be perceived as an influx of money to the market if invested

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