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Analyzing the Poitical Philosophy on King Lear

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The political philosophy presented in King Lear, in my opinion, is a more on the deception of successors. I believe that Shakespeare is attempting to suggest that just because you have the blood of royals, should you really be given the title that comes with it. Shakespeare seems to be suggesting to the royals that the successor should not be who is lucky enough to receive the crown, but possibly someone who will know and understand how to rule properly. It seems Shakespeare might have been in more favor of a democratic government than the royal courts.
Before a reader can understand how this philosophy is in the text one must understand the characters. Starting with the character with the most significance, we have King Lear. As the first scene begins we see him approach the stage as a sickening old man. He speaks strong though, despite his physical appearance. This might be to show the reader his status as king over all others. Its seems though that King Lear is more about his image as king rather than the people he is to govern. He is then to ask his daughters to explain their love for him, and the most affectionate towards him should receive all the inheritance. At this point we see two of his three daughters express how much they love him. He first calls his eldest born daughter, Goneril, to express her emotions first which she replies with “Sir, I love you more than words can wield the matter; Dearer than eyesight, space, and liberty; 
Beyond what can be valued, rich or rare; 
No less than life, with grace, health, beauty, honour; 
As much as child e'er lov'd, or father found; 
A love that makes breath poor, and speech unable.
Beyond all manner of so much I love you.” (1.1.55-60). Obviously, to any reader, she is over exag...

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