Analysis of Robert Frost's Poem, Departmental

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Analysis of Robert Frost's Poem, Departmental

“Departmental” by Robert Frost is a poem written in rhymed couplets with three beats per line (trimeter). Throughout the poem, Frost uses poetic devices such as personification, allusion, rhyme, and alliteration. The poem as a whole serves as a metaphor for the way humans deal with issues like death.

The poem begins with a description of a scene familiar to many, “an ant on a tablecloth…” Then the ant bumps into a day drowsy moth that is much larger than him. The ant seems a tad bit jealous that the moth lacks the amount of responsibility that ants are burdened with. The ant thinks that if the moth were one of his own race he’d chastise him and send him back to work. He describes how the ant society is much more sophisticated and intellectual than the likes of the moth. Their philosophy is to learn about religion, nature, and space. The ant then being concerned with his own duties hurries back to his own job. The ant subsequently runs into another ant carrying “the body of one of their dead.” The poem goes on to describe the ants’ treatment and procedures of the dead. The ants are not taken aback by the death “… isn’t even given a moment’s arrest, seems not even impressed.” However, word of the deceased is passed along among the ants, “death has come to Jerry McCormick.” They reflect briefly on the life of Jerry, mentioning that he was a “selfless forager.” The dutiful priorities of the ants then kick in when they put o...

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