Analysis of Marcus Brutus in Julius Caesar, by William Shakespeare

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In William Shakespeare’s tragic play Julius Caesar, the protagonist, Brutus, conspires against and successfully kills Caesar; to only find the city he loves in chaos and mutiny from his actions. Brutus in the eyes of many people was a noble and honorable man who loved and adored the city of Rome, and no person thought more of this than Caesar. To Caesar, Brutus was the son he never had, and his love of Brutus was known, therefore the thought of Brutus betraying him was absurd. However, imagine if not only Brutus did not love Caesar, but he hated him. If that was the situation in the Julius Caesar, the play would then change drastically, with almost every quote from Brutus changing. If this is the case, Brutus’ hatred of Caesar and love of Rome leads to the murder of Caesar because of Brutus’ fear of Caesar becoming king. It was known that Brutus loved Rome, but was it his hatred of Caesar concealed? Brutus is a high ranking man in Rome and a very close friend to Caesar. We see in the beginning that Brutus has many eternal troubles that he is battling and that his insecurities make him easily manipulated. If Brutus hated Caesar, Brutus would not have killed Caesar for Rome, but out of envy and rivalry making his murder savage and gruesome. While trying to convince the plebeians how the murder of Caesar was for their freedom and why they should see them as honorable men protecting Rome, he said “Not that/ I loved Caesar less, but that I love Rome more.” I believe this quote would not change because Brutus wants the multitude to believe what he is saying, and adding that he did love Caesar, but loved their city more made it seem as if Brutus and the conspirators did an unselfish act. If Brutus could betray his friend he loved for... ... middle of paper ... ...wn emotions over for the fact that Caesar would become a king and then overtime tyrant, enslaving the people of Rome. He felt it was only way to protect the people of Rome, not for a personal reason, similar to the other men in the conspiracy. This quote in particular would change drastically in that his personal cause would be out his hatred and envy of Caesar and his adore for the general public of Rome. Brutus’ hatred and the love of Rome would be the only motivation to kill Caesar, making him not stopping for anything until his motivation was fulfilled. The play Julius Caesar would be very different if Brutus’ motivation was hatred instead for the general public and city of Rome. His fear that Caesar would become king was put over his own personal relationships in hope that Rome would somehow be better and more prosperous if Caesar was no longer the ruler.

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