Analysis Of Wuthering Heights By Charlotte Bronte

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The story begins from the point of view of an outsider, who temporarily resides in Yorkshire Moor, Northern England in 1801. The actual event concerns itself with two families who live in Thrushcross Grange and Wuthering Heights, each four miles apart, in 1778. Thrushcross Grange is two miles within Thrushcross Park. Gimmerton is the nearest town that provides residence for minor characters. Penistone Crags is a desolate, but beautiful rocky landscape that is a mile and a half away from the Heights that becomes a symbol of freedom, youth, and carefreeness; this is especially true for Catherine Linton. The moor generally experiences harsh winters and mild and cool summers. The weather in the moor often reflects the mood of the protagonists,…show more content…
The novel begins with the point of view of Mr. Lockwood, a new tenant who resides at Thrushcross Grange. Then the story shifts to Ellen, Nelly, Dean’s perspective from twenty-three years ago. Ms. Dean recollects the past and Mr. Lockwood chronicles the tale. Unfortunately, Ms. Dean supplies a substantial amount of unreliable or distorted information. Some are hearsay and gossip from nosy servants and workers, who tend to enhance the original tale by adding more drama than necessary. Lockwood’s perspective serves as first impression of the current characters. His fresh eye is crucial for readers, as it not only lessen the bias, but also measures Heathcliff’s character development. Readers can engage with the past and use knowledge from the future to understand Heathcliff’s personality and shortcomings. The additional perspective can also reveal facets of other characters’ personalities that Ms. Dean failed to…show more content…
Dean is a bold, traditional, and frugal housekeeper who originally worked at the Heights to look after Hindley and Catherine Earnshaw. She, like many others, discriminates against Heathcliff because of his appearance and background. In her first encounter with Heathcliff, she refers to him as ‘stupid little thing’ (46). Although Ms. Dean attempts to accept and understand, there is undoubtedly bias. The diction she employs to describe facial features, mostly hair, eyes, and skin color, suggests her prejudice. Since she highly regards aristocracy, she does not understand Heathcliff’s struggles and Catherine’s discomfort at the Grange. Considering Ms. Dean’s background and traditional mindset, she undermines the severity of some situations. After Catherine Earnshaw 's death, the housekeeper’s primary concern is the unfortunate gender of the only Linton heir. “A great addition, in my eyes, was his being left without an heir. I bemoaned that, as I gazed on the feeble orphans; and I mentally abused old Linton for (what was only natural partiality) the securing his estate to his own daughter instead of his son’s” (204). This statement showcases the sexism principles of the time, as well as Dean’s past economic struggles. Additionally, because she took lightly of Catherine’s threat and mental illness, Ms. Dean unintentionally worsened Catherine’s condition and the couple’s relationship. Edgar and Catherine was unable to resolve their issues and clear the misconceptions that Ms.
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