Analysis Of The Tell Tale Heart By Edgar Allan Poe

716 Words3 Pages
The works of Edgar Allan Poe are well known for being rather strange, dark, and grim. A great many of Poe’s stories and poems tend to revolve around a single idea, which is death. In one of Poe’s stories “The Tell-Tale Heart”, it starts right off the bat with introducing the narrator who seems to speak strangely. From this introduction it gives a clue on what the theme or the main idea is in the story of “The Tell-Tale Heart” which is the ramblings of a cruel schizophrenic madman. In the first sentence the narrator is trying to convince the reader that the killing of the old man out of the man’s fear of the blue eye was justified. Which as the narrator starts to insist very aggressively to the reader that he is not a madman, then begins to…show more content…
In order for the narrator to get to the pushing point to indeed kill the old man the narrator had to focus in to his own paranoia and the hatred of the old man’s blue eye. While being overcome with the hatred the man does not see the old man as another human being instead the man disconnects any emotions in order to act out the violent act of killing (Cruelty in “The Tell-Tale Heart”). Though the cruel act does not end there the man then starts to dismember the old man and then hides the parts of the body under the floorboard in the bedroom. Once more as if the man could even be more heartless when the cops were called out to investigate the narrator just lets them in with an air of arrogance to him “I smiled-for what had I to fear? I bade the gentlemen welcome” (Poe,…show more content…
Though it comes more into light once the mean allows the two officers inside the house as the three of them sit right above where the old man’s body was hidden. As the officers talk pleasantly, the man is writhing in anguish thinking that the cops complacency is just a mockery as the man is sitting there hearing the heartbeat of the dead old man get louder and louder (Guilt in “The Tell-Tale Heart”). As the beat grows louder and louder it drives the narrator to insanity over his guilt of killing the old man. Thus with the louder beat the man believes that the officers can hear it to and unable to hear the beating any longer the narrator confesses to the crime of killing the old man (“Explanation of: ‘The Tell-Tale Heart’ by Edgar Allan
Open Document