Analysis Of The Passionate Shepherd To His Love And Sonnet 18 By Edmund Spenser

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Poetry is continously seen as a way of leaving a mark in various poems, especially those of Sonnet 18 by William Shakespeare, as well as Sonnet 75 by Edmund Spenser. Spenser states to his love, that his “verse your virtues rare shall eternize,” basically declaring that through his poetry she will live forever (Spenser 11). It seems vain of the speaker to say that his poems will live forever, since he seems to regard himself in such a high standard. Shakespeare was also confident of his skills, as proven when he writes; “When in eternal lines to time thou grow’st” (Shakespeare 12). He seems to also be giving the ultimate proclamation of love to his special one by implying that he will have her in the history books with amazing poems about her.…show more content…
They seemed to had deifted off from thinking about those above them, and instead started focusing on themselves more than anything else. This is evident by the large amount of poems about a significant other. Christopher Marlowe demonstrates this idea in “The Passionate Shepherd to His Love” by speaking about nature and how the “steepy mountain yield” all of the beautiful sights he sees (Marlowe 4). He is also describing this to his interest, and does not seem to even mention another entity throughout the whole poem, emphasizing the change to individualism. This change is also demonstrated in Sonnet 31 by Sir Philip Sidney were he brings up, “that busy archer,” referring to Cupid (Stanley 4). This shows that poets at the time were not afraid to go against what the Church would deem suitable at the time, so they wrote whatever they felt was best for themselves. The poets translated the idea of becoming more independent and not having to get so much from a higher entity, which could still be translated into…show more content…
He compares his relationship with his love as “stiff twin compasses” and other similar comparisons to describe their unity (Dunne 26). Like a compass, they always seem to be working cohesively as one unit. It could have the same theme as “The Passionate Shephard to His Love” by Christopher Marlowe, the theme of love conquering all. They both seem to have an idealistic view to the relationship as well, as the shephard in Marlowe’s poem insists that his love “will all the pleasures prove” if she were to go with him (Marlowe 2). Both poems aim for a perfect life with their love, and Donne’s poem manages to come up with a more realistic option out of the
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