Analysis Of 'The Great Gatsby'

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The Great Gatsby 4+1 Q10: Gatsby’s Funeral Jay Gatsby’s funeral is a small service, not because that 's what was intended, but because no one bothered to show up. Nick wanted to give Gatsby the popularity he desired, even in death, but only three people were present in the end. Gatsby’s father, Henry C. Gatz, shows up unexpectedly from Minnesota because he heard about the news in the papers. He believes that the man who shot his son must 've been mad, that no one in their right mind could commit such a horrible act. Daisy and Wolfsheim, the people closest to Gatsby in the book, do not attend. This exemplifies that it was always about wealth and social status for them, including Tom, and they never genuinely cared for Gatsby. Nick held up hope,…show more content…
Logically speaking, George Wilson is the one who shot Gatsby out of anger and sadness. His wife was murdered and he wanted someone to pay for what they had done, and rightfully so. It is possible that Gatsby would have never died if Wilson wasn’t egged on by Tom, the one who gave him Gatsby’s name. Tom wanted to protect his guilty wife, so he sent a man in a precarious mental state after an innocent person. Ultimately, Tom Buchanan is to blame for Gatsby’s death because he was motivated by his selfish desires, rather than a need for justice. Both Tom and Daisy hurt people to get what they wanted “and then retreated back into their money or their vast carelessness… and let other people clean up the mess they had made,” (Fitzgerald 191) just as Wilson acted on Tom’s…show more content…
A multitude of characters in the book are corrupted by a number of things, including money and other materialistic items. Beginning with Gatsby, who became who he is through criminal activities and lying. Discovered within the book, “that 's one of his little stunts. [Tom] picked him for a bootlegger the first time [he] saw him, and [he] wasn 't far wrong." (Fitzgerald 143) He lied to Nick about his identity and his family to enlist his help with Daisy. Daisy herself is corrupted by wealth and the need for a high social class, considering she cried when entering Gatsby’s home for the first time because she had never seen such beautiful shirts. The superficial people who attend Gatsby 's parties to gawk at his home surround him with more corruption and bring light to another central theme of the corrupt American Dream. Tom and Myrtle are also corrupt in that they participate in adultery, along with Daisy and Gatsby. Corruption is clear and evident throughout the book, encompassing the worlds of West Egg, East Egg, and the Valley of Ashes as they
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