Analysis Of The Drive To Perfect Humanity

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Perhaps one of the most controversial topics to be addressed in the modern age concerns the ethicality of being able to “edit” our species. The debate for modifying the human genome asks us to consider the very core of our nature and the morality behind deliberately changing our written genetic code to produce “superior” offspring. For example, what kinds of consequences could result from altering the precise code of our DNA? Some scientists ask whether altering the genome of fetuses or adults will produce unwanted results that could end up being passed down through generations, causing more harm than good. Scientists also want to know how far people are willing to participate in or accept from this practice. For example, should we manipulate…show more content…
Professor and ethicist Karen Peterson-Iyer studies a wide range of religious and moral viewpoints on human genetic modification, worrying that as we change our genetic code, our views towards children themselves will also change. She proposes the possibility of “designer babies” in the near future, children genetically altered to fulfill a parent’s idealistic expectations. In her article, called “The Drive to Perfect Humanity”, Peterson-Iyer first recognizes that though the efforts to improve our lives and reduce suffering through genetic manipulation are indeed reasonable and admirable, there are important factors that we should pay attention to before blindly jumping into such a momentous advancement. Firstly, she worries that efforts to improve and shape our children will develop into a tendency to focus on a child’s “quality”, and see children as nothing more than hurried “products” or “consumer goods” to be perfected. Peterson-Iyer proposes the idea of a condition called "perfect child syndrome", in which parent would neurotically terminate all pregnancies that could produce “lesser” children until they reach their “perfect child” (Peterson-Iyer, “The Drive to Perfect Humanity”). Much like some parents already pressure their children into being flawless individuals, genetic manipulation may lead parents to push their children with harsh, extreme expectations, which has is called a “new form of child abuse” (Peterson-Iyer, “The Drive to Perfect Humanity”).…show more content…
In the article, “Challenges raised by Gene Editing”, Kazuto Kato, professor of Biomedical Ethics and Public Policy, discusses the opinions and advancements concerning gene editing in Japan. He describes that Japan’s Panel on Bioethics of the Council for Science, Technology, and Innovation has been debating over the topic of genetic revising in embryos since June 2015. The panel decided that gene edits that could be hereditary should not be allowed for a number of moral and practical reasons. As for research, they decided that only after rigid moral reviews would certain gene research be acceptable. Kato himself has been able to attend many of these international and national meetings on the subject, and expresses his views and what he learned from these activities. He (claims) that the “international summit has had a positive influence on the discussion of gene editing in Japan” (Kato, “Challenges raised by Gene Editing”). He claims that was able to attend the International Summit on Human Gene editing, said that all of the members at the summit strongly agreed that the science community should not ~~ to altering germline genes in humans. However, he believes within a certain foundation, and ~~ it might be ok. For example, he lives in South Africa, where exponential rate of HIV~~. He claims that people should benefit and says that not enough has been done to accurately (estimate) the possible benefits of genomics (Kato, “Challenges raised by Gene Editing”). He wishes
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