preview

Analysis Of The Crito

Good Essays
Crito is trying to persuade Socrates to escape not only because Crito feels he will lose a beloved friend, but also because he feels the majority will judge him for valuing himself over Socrates. In the passage, Socrates states many arguments to try and explain to Crito that the opinions of the majority do not and should not matter. The most compelling argument Socrates gives for this claim is when he states, “I am the kind of man who listens only to the argument that on reflection seems best to me” (Socrates, The Crito pg.4). I agree with Socrates’s claim not only because the words from the wise and the intelligent are far more likely to be sound, but also because listening to the knowledgeable is more likely to lead you to a more fulfilling…show more content…
Socrates begins the passage by simply asking Crito why he thinks opinions matter. Throughout the passage, Crito and Socrates each give reasons to back up their argument. Crito starts off by explaining to Socrates that by letting himself stay in jail, he is letting people believe that he does not care about his friends or family. Crito also goes on to say, throughout the passage, that accepting his own death is wrong and is technically breaking the law to do so. Socrates replies that everyone has an opinion, but not everybody’s opinion is just. It is not about the opinion but whether or not the opinion is a justified opinion (Socrates, The Crito). Later in the discussion, Socrates goes on to explain to Crito that most of the time when we follow the majority we are not following what we find true to ourselves, which then leads us to a less fulfilling life. Toward the end of the dialogue, Crito accepts what his friend, Socrates, is…show more content…
In addition, the knowledgeable are more likely to be more sound and more likely to lead you to a life worth living. For example, in the dialogue, Socrates states, “one should greatly value some opinions, but not others. Does that seem sound (Socrates, The Crito pg. 5)?” Yes, because if I was sick and the majority were going to a waitress because he or she was cheaper, I would still choose to go to a doctor. I would rather listen to someone wise than go to someone with lesser knowledge for a cheaper amount. Also, Socrates’s claim is justified because of one of his arguments he presents in the dialogue. He states that taking part in an unacceptable action can ruin your soul and life is not worth living if it means having a ruined soul. Therefore; Socrates is saying he would rather die than live a dull life. Socrates believed that feeling pure inside was far more important than lying, cheating, and guilting his way out. He would much rather have a pure soul than an evil soul like the unintelligent guards (Socrates, The Crito pg. 8). Even though this argument seems solid, there is still objections to Socrates’s claim.
Crito thinks that we should care about the opinions of others, but Socrates claims otherwise. One possible objection to Socrates’s claim is how do we differentiate the difference between the wise and the unintelligent?
Get Access