Analysis Of Socrates's 'Always Outnumbered, Always Outgunned'

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If a story has chapters that interconnect, is it considered a novel or a series of short stories? A novel is defined as a fictitious prose narrative of book length, typically representing characters and action with some degree of realism. A short story is a piece of prose fiction, which can be read in a single sitting. In a debate of whether “Always Outnumbered, Always Outgunned” is a novel or series of short stories, one controversial issue has been that it is a novel. On the one hand, people argue that it is a novel because they can read the whole book in order. On the other hand, people oppose they can read a different chapters at a time. Others even believe it is both because it can be a novel with a series of short stories. My own view is it is a series of short stories because first, the short stories are all interconnected, yet they are written so they can be read independently of one another, second, Each story, Socrates confronts a situation in which his own unique moral compass is his only guide, and third, the stories give the reader a glimpse into some parts of Socrates’ past, either through flashback scenes or a dream sequence.

In “Always
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But on the other hand, I see why people consider it a series of short stories. I would classify this book as a series of short stories because you can read different chapters at different times. You do not have to necessarily read the book from the first chapter. First, the short stories are all interconnected, yet they are written so they can be read independently of one another. Second, in each story Socrates confronts a situation in which his own unique moral compass is his only guide. Third, the stories give the reader a glimpse into some parts of Socrates’ past, either through flashback scenes or dream sequence. That is why “Always Outnumbered, Always Outgunned” is a series of short
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