Analysis Of Slice Of Life

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Watch A Slice of Life and Enjoy It Too Slice of Life is a genre of storytelling in which the characters, the setting and the situation appear to be realistic or naturalistic, as opposed to escapist (also termed 'larger than life), and thus representative of real life. In this sub-genre, a seemingly random part of the character(s) life is depicted and is often left open ended. Also in such stories: there need not be a meaningful plot, there may be little progress, and conflicts that arise need not get resolved. The term is a translation of “tranche de vie” (French), which was likely created by playwright Jean Jullien (1854–1919). He said in his 'The Living Theatre' (1892): "A play is a slice of life put onstage with art... our purpose is not…show more content…
It stars retired boxer Mickey Rourke, who plays a professional wrestler trying to reclaim his past glory in spite of his age and ill health. The film won the Golden Lion at Venice and has a 98% critics rating on rottentomatoes.com. Rourke receive a BAFTA and a Golden Globe as well as Academy nomination for Best…show more content…
Ken Loach and Mike Leigh. Loach's second film, “Kes” (1969), about a young boy who's life starts to transform as he trains his pet falcon, is ranked seventh in the British Film Institute's Top Ten British Films and it is also in the top ten list of the 50 films you should see by the age of 14. And a must watch is “Raining Stones” (1993), about a man proud of and in love with his family and religion, and who wants to buy a very expensive dress for his daughter's First Communion. In his blind quest he starts to stray from his very principles that he has lived by all his life, putting his family, his values, and even his salvation at stake. The film won a Cannes Special Jury Prize Also “Riff-Raff” (1991), which won the Felix award for Best European Film, as well as “Land and Freedom” (1995), which won the the FIPRESCI International Critics Prize and the Ecumenical Jury Prize at Cannes. Leigh is known for taking ordinary characters in ordinary, every-day situations, and turning the slice into a relatable yet riveting
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