Analysis Of Rabbit Proof Fence

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The planning sequence of the activities was changed in accordance with each group member in order to further cater for Australian Curriculum English strand achievement standards and student needs surrounding the literature stands and sub strands. Each inter-text explored a variety of activities spread over three lessons. They utilised and compared the text to the Mentor text to establish a sound understanding through the development of prior and recent knowledge. Firstly, the introduction of mentor text Girl with no name, was sequenced first to provide a sense of knowledge and understanding when exploring the sub strand ‘Responding to literature- ACELT1620, surrounding ideas of Indigenous cultures before exploring the three inter-texts.…show more content…
Prior knowledge was within this lesson. The developmental phase is sequenced in the middle as a means of communicating to students the impact colonisation had towards Indigenous communities. Finally, One hundred and Fifty years’ poem, 150 years after European settlement engages students to utilise prior knowledge of the inter-texts and explore the impact white settles has on Indigenous Communities, therefore, referring to the ‘Responding to literature’ sub strand- ACELT 1621. By sequencing the unit activities in this order, the end goals were established clearer. In addition, through sequencing the unit, the anticipation of difficult and problem areas aid in the potential for scaffolding, needed to assist students to meet the outcomes and goals Being responsible for developing a sequence of activities, it is important to assess prior knowledge and skills early in the unit to help scaffold and foster student engagement and critical thinking. By using the text The Rabbits and planning a three lesson module after the mentor text, surrounding of the colonisation of Australia, students use prior knowledge of History and apply their understandings to the English…show more content…
The picture book portrays the theme of colonisation within Australia, told from the viewpoint of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders (Possums). The narrative introduces the arrival of the rabbits (Europeans) and through reader analysis can be suggested that the story tells the factional events of colonisation. This inter-text is used to form the basis of work developed throughout the task. In terms of the language features (grammatical features, style), the text is written in second person and from the point of views of the tree dwellers (Indigenous communities) while the rabbits (Europeans) are silenced. Adjectival and descriptive language are utilised throughout the text, for example “the land is bare and brown and the wind blows empty across the plain”, creating imagery. The author, incorporates Aboriginal English into the text, “the rabbits came many grandparents ago.” Additionally, the text features (format, illustrations and graphs) are used in relation to the related text. Firstly, the angles which are used within the illustrations are distant. This identified the position the tree dwellers are in, where they view the rabbits. However, as the book progress’, the illustrations become close, suggesting the interaction of the colonisation. At the start of the text, bold and bright colours are utilised, however, when war is introduced, colours are turned into dark and gloomy. These features are
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