Analysis Of Peace Came In The Form Of A Women

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Native American’s place in United States history is not as simple as the story of innocent peace loving people forced off their lands by racist white Americans in a never-ending quest to quench their thirst for more land. Accordingly, attempts to simplify the indigenous experience to nothing more than victims of white aggression during the colonial period, and beyond, does an injustice to Native American history. As a result, historians hoping to shed light on the true history of native people during this period have brought new perceptive to the role Indians played in their own history. Consequently, the theme of power and whom controlled it over the course of Native American/European contact is being presented in new ways. Examining the evolving…show more content…
Juliana Barr’s book, Peace Came in the Form of a Women: Indians and Spaniards in the Texas Borderlands. Dr. Barr, professor of history at Duke University-specializes in women’s role in American history. Peace Came in the Form of A Women, is an examination on the role of gender and kinship in the Texas territory during the colonial period. An important part of her book is Spanish settlers and slavery in their relationship with Natives in the region. Even though her book clearly places political, economic, and military power in the hands of Natives in the Texas borderland, her book details Spanish attempts to wrestle that power away from indigenous people through forced captivity of native women. For example, Dr, Barr wrote, “In varying diplomatic strategies, women were sometimes pawns, sometimes agents.” To put it another way, women were an important part of Apache, Wichita, and Comanche culture and Spanish settlers attempted to exploit…show more content…
Andres Resendez, professor of history at the University of California Davis. In his monograph, The Other Slavery: The Uncovered Story of Indian Enslavement in America, he argues that Europeans initially held all power in the indigenous slave trade and only after centuries did Natives begin to wrestle that power away. Unlike Rushforth and Barr, Dr. Resendez claims that from the earliest contact, Europeans planned and executed a strategy to capture and enslave indigenous Americans for financial benefit. Like Gallay, Resendez asserts the practice of slavery was central in establishing control over the earliest
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