Analysis Of Mirrors By Lucy Grealy

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Mirror, Mirror on the Wall Don’t judge a book by its cover. Meeting someone for the first time is much different than knowing them for a while. Firstly, people tend to notice appearance before all other characteristics even become a thought. Today, appearance plays a major role in the way people perceive us. One’s image, nowadays, is becoming increasingly more important to others, rather than personality or intelligence. This may be the case because modern society is greatly influenced by one’s beauty. Style and facial structure are the first things a majority of people take note upon when encountering others. This “silent judgement” of others becomes a main factor into why people, especially women, put so much thought into their…show more content…
In her passage, “Mirrors”, Grealy discusses her struggle with appearance and beauty as a whole. Winning her battle with childhood cancer has its consequences. This aggressive cancer left her face extremely disfigured. Due to this result, many people gawked at Grealy and treated her differently than one would towards a beautiful woman. This drove her into a sense of shame and depression based on her appearance alone. Since Grealy was a young woman at the time, many cases of bullying and name calling came from grown men. At points in her life, Grealy was so embarrassed of her facial construction, that she refused to look at herself in any form of reflection. Later on in the passage, Grealy states, “To keep myself thinking objectively, I became an obsessive reader and an obsessive TV watcher…”. (38). Lucy Grealy explains that she made these mental escapes to distract herself from obsessing over her gruesome appearance. She also desired to escape from the pain she was experiencing from multiple facial surgeries, in order to make herself, too, physically beautiful. She stated, “I was given these moments of grace and insight, only to be invariably followed by a clumsy tumble into narcissism.” (37). This short passage embodies the struggles that many women come across. This is so because the iconic image of a beautiful woman is deeply engraved in our thoughts. A large portion of younger…show more content…
Throughout time, these standards have shifted. In Susan Sontag’s piece, “Women’s Beauty: Put Down or Power Source?”, she goes into depth within this topic of beauty and how ancient times differ from present day views. In this passage, Sontag discusses the views of beauty in ancient Greece. Within the first few lines of this passage, Sontag states “For the Greeks, beauty was a virtue: A kind of excellence.”…”If it did occur to the Greeks to distinguish between a person 's "inside" and "outside," they still expected that inner beauty would be matched by beauty of the other kind.” (1). In times like these, beauty was seen as something that can be on the outside, physical beauty, as well as something on the inside, intelligence or character. Society has come a long way and this ideology of beauty has changed. Nowadays, we tend to focus on the “outer” appearance of someone, and almost completely disregard their “inner” beauty. Throughout this passage, Sontag distinguishes the difference between a handsome man and a beautiful woman. She states, “For the ideal of beauty is administered as a form of self-oppression.” (6). Sontag goes on to discuss this ideology by saying “Women are taught to see their bodies in parts, and to evaluate each part separately.”…” Nothing less than perfection will do.” (6). This statement is valid for present day society. Women are expected to act and look a certain way in order to be physically
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