Analysis Of Martin Luther King Letter From A Birmingham Jail

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History is known to be unfair, unequal and ruthless. From wars to racism to segregation to desegregation. America has always been in a turmoil of what is right from wrong. In 1954 – 1968, African-American civil rights movement, segregation elevated by race. An African American man rose to the challenge hoping to seek equality for all. That man was not only a minister, but a leader in the Civil Rights Movement: a spokesperson, social activist, protesting in a non-violent manner. His name was Martin Luther King Jr. On April 16, 1963, King wrote a “Letter from a Birmingham Jail,” to his “Dear Fellow Clergymen.” Throughout the letter, King wrote different aspects and arguments of the injustice in Birmingham, his strongest argument was of the “two…show more content…
There he protested of the high level of segregation and violence against the black. However, he was arrested since he was not allowed to protest in Birmingham, Alabama. While he sat in his jail cell, he wrote a letter, “The Negro is your Brother” better known as “Letter from a Birmingham Jail.” The letter was written to answer the Statement by Alabama Clergymen. He explained why he was there in the first place: “I am here in Birmingham because injustice is here” (3) Plus, he answers their criticism: “But since I feel that you are men of genuine good will and that your criticisms are sincerely set forth, I want to try to answer your statement in what I hope will be patient and reasonable terms”…show more content…
He wrote, “We have waited for more than three hundred and forty years for our constitution and God given rights. ….we still creep at horse and buggy pace towards gaining a cup of coffee at a lunch counter” (6). It is rude and unfair. They are still waiting for their rights for equality and freedom. In 1865, slavery was abolished with the Emancipation Proclamation issued by Abraham Lincoln; it declared those who were slaves shall be free. Plus, the Articles of the US Constitution give rights to all: The First Amendment does not allow a law “…prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble…” (United States of America 1789 (rev. 1992)). The Thirteenth Amendment declared “Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude …shall exist within the United States nor any place subject to their jurisdiction” (United States of America 1789 (rev. 1992)). The Fourteenth Amendment stated, “All persons born or naturalized in the United States and subject to the jurisdiction therefore, are citizen of the United States and of the State wherein they reside” (United States of America 1789 (rev. 1992)). Yet, in 1963, there are still seen as slaves being segregated and even humiliated with racial signs. And those who are born there are not seen as citizens. Even King was not given his
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