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Analysis Of Lucretia Mott And Elizabeth Cady Douglass

opinionated Essay
1524 words
1524 words
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From early age, women were push aside just because they were women. They were softer and not as stronger as men. A lot of people looked at them as just mothers or wives and nothing more. Their job was to take care of the house, kids, help their mothers, and other chores like that. Any time that they start to talk, about their right, about inequality, men shut them. They were not allowed to say anything, they had no right.
They belonged to their father and after marriage to their husband. They weren’t even allwed to have the same education as their brothers. Until finally in 1848, two brave women, Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, decided that it’s the time to make a change. Although after 72 years, women were finally allowed …show more content…

In this essay, the author

  • Opines that all men and women are created equal.
  • Opines that on the second day of the convention, a website dedicated to this day in history commemorated it.
  • Opines that the fact that some supporters withdrew their support, was not really a problem.
  • Opines that women needed help to change the law.
  • Opines that religious leaders and the press were also against the government.
  • Opines that the other thing that could point out is, it was supposed to be “resolved.
  • Explains that women were softer and not as strong as men. they were supposed to take care of the house, kids, help their mothers, and other chores.
  • Explains that two brave women, lucretia mott and elizabeth cady stanton, decided that it's time to make a change. after 72 years, women were finally allowed to vote, but the decleration of sentiment is still not completely.
  • Explains that the first women's right convention was held in 1848 in seneca falls, new york. the purpose of this meeting was that women had the right to equality in all aspects of their lives.
  • Cites the ninth resolution, which declared "it is the duty of the women of this country to secure to themselves their sacred right to the elective.
  • Opines that the first movement for women's right was a very important turning point.
  • Explains that the ladies of philadelphia are resolved to maintain their women's rights. a pretty girl is equal to ten thousand men, and a mother is powerful.
  • Explains that religious was a very serious part of people's lives. even today, many families practice religious virtues and base their lives according to the religion.
  • Narrates how stanton joined forces with susan b. anthony in 1851, and the two devoted much of the remainder of their lives.
  • Opines that all women died before women had the right to vote, except charlotte woodward pierce, who signed the decleration in her late teenage years.
  • Opines that while the law supports men more, it creates false public sentiment by giving to the world a different code of morals.
  • Opines that women are considered outcast or not taking seriously or men are allowed to behave in some ways.
  • Opines that men would still look at a woman as an outcast and try to prove that women are not really good or educated in these ares.
  • Analyzes how women tried to teach society that women should have the right to dress as they want like men, without being judged or harrest or calling names, but a lot of people still can't understand that.
  • Argues that the dress code for girls is stricer than that for boys, and that men should be distracted by women's bare legs and arms.
  • Opines that we should all teach ourselves, our kids, and our friends and families that they're all human, regardless of gender or sex.

The purpose of this meeting was that women had the right to equality in all aspects of their lives, including the right to vote. According to Denise
Knight “much to the surprise of Stanton and Mott, the convention drew some three hundred people from miles around. Among those in attendance were forty men, including the abolitionist and former slave Frederick Douglass. It was there that the Declaration of
Sentiments, drafted by Stanton, was introduced. “ Stanton began the declaration with the statement that "all men and women are created equal.” She wanted to pointed out that the language of declaration of independence had excluded women and as equal beings, women should also have the rights. According to the website this day in history “On the second day of the convention the Declaration of Sentiments and Grievances was adopted and signed by the assembly. The convention also passed 12 resolutions–11 unanimously–which called for specific equal rights for women. The ninth resolution, which declared “it is the duty of the women of this country to secure to themselves their sacred right to the elective franchise,” was the only one to meet opposition.” Some people signed the …show more content…

And so for people who their religious said that men have the right to control women and women should obey them, it wasn’t that easy for them to accept that women and men be equal and be treated equally. Although there was a lot of objection and disagreement about women’s right, and a lot of people who tried to stop the movement, or made fun of people who believed women were equal to men, that didn’t stop women from fighting. “n 1851 Stanton joined forces with Susan B. Anthony, and the two devoted much of the remainder of their lives to fighting discrimination against women. Without question, however, it was Stanton 's
Declaration of Sentiments that first politicized the issues that would take center stage in the struggle to attain equality for women.” (Inglis-Arkell) these women sacrificed their lifetime so women could have their own rights. A lot of people made fun of them, a lot of people outcast them from the society or community, and the sad part is that all of them died before women have to right to vote, except one of them, Charlotte Woodward Pierce. She was the only person that was in her late teenage years when she signed the decleration and was lucky enough to stay alive and finally see the result of their

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