Analysis Of Kate Chopin's 'The Storm'

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“The Storm” by Kate Chopin illustrates an affair between old lovers, Calixta and Alcée. “For my Lover, Returning to His Wife” by Anne Sexton, the narrator describes that the man she is having an affair with will never leave his wife for her. “Adultery” by James Dickey proves that at times an affair is nothing more than just an affair. Throughout all three texts, you begin to read the different attitudes towards sexual and marital fidelity and the different reactions the individuals have to their affairs. Although, infidelity is viewed as a terrible thing, some people have reasons for the actions. Chopin perfectly describes an incredulous situation where two people are brought together by “fate” in “The Storm.” By “fate”, I mean, it wasn’t…show more content…
“Let’s face it, I have been momentary,” in this line the narrator is clearly stating that she knows she is nothing more than sex (Sexton 349). The narrator understands that the man she has more than lust for is in love with his wife who has been “melted carefully” for him. The narrator in this poem is just a slutty mistress who doesn’t really care whose life she messes up. She is being selfish in the sense that she doesn’t really care that a man is only using her for sex. She doesn’t care that she is only temporary and soon after this affair ends the man would’ve have found a new mistress or decided to be faithful to his wife (which I doubt). The narrator doesn’t describe needing to be faithful to someone else showing that she doesn’t understand the pain she is actually causing. Where as, the man is only physically involved with the narrator. Because she knows he will always love his wife and his fidelity will be with his wife and his children, even though, he is not faithful (Sexton 350). Although in this situation it doesn’t seem so clean cut as to why the affair began, but for all we know it could be a girl trying to feel loved. Meaning that, she has the affair because she knows for a short amount of time when they are having sex she can feel important enough to a man, even being just a…show more content…
James Dickey illustrates the pleasures and guilt that comes with an affair. The rush one gets with the fear of getting caught (Dickey 351). The narrator in the poem seems to have no problem with the affair because he clearly states he will call again if he can, proving that he is barely fazed by not remaining faithful. It is clear that both the narrator and the mistress are pressed for time in this sick lust affair they are having. Both equally nervous about being caught by a significant other or someone, but they don’t seem to care enough to end their relationship. In this case, there seems to be no act of fidelity because the narrator says he’ll see her next week (Dickey
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