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Analysis Of Dr. Michael Shermer's The Moral Arc

analytical Essay
1967 words
1967 words
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Dr. Michael Shermer is a Professor, Founder of skeptic magazine, and a distinguished and brilliant American science writer to say the least. In His book The Moral Arc: How Science Makes Us Better People he sets out to embark on the daunting task of convincing and informing the reader on sciences’ ability to drives the expansion of humanity and the growth of the moral sphere. Although such a broad and general topic could be hard to explain, Shermer does so in a way that is concise, easy to understand, and refreshing for the reader. This novel is riddled with scientific facts, data, and pictures to back up shermers claims about the history of science, humanity and how the two interact with one another. In part I, Shermer begins by going over …show more content…

In this essay, the author

  • Explains dr. michael shermer's book, the moral arc: how science makes us better people, which is riddled with scientific facts, data, and pictures to back up his claims about the history of science and humanity.
  • Analyzes how shermer examines the link between humanity and science by introducing the notion that we come into this world with some sort of moral compass, inherently knowing basic rights from wrongs.
  • Analyzes how shermer defines an action as being morally correct only if it increases an individual’s chances of survival and flourishing.
  • Analyzes how shermer argues that religion cannot be the driver of moral progress because it is based on only showing morality to those who participate in the same religious beliefs.
  • Analyzes how shermer expresses his belief that moral arc bends towards freedom and justice. he describes how reasoning and science fueled intellectual arguments and drove people to take certain political actions.
  • Analyzes how michael shermer's enlightenment period led to the dissolution of immoral practices, such as slavery. women are freed by science because of their reproductive rights.
  • Analyzes how shermer describes moral regress and pathways to evil by setting up the reader in the mind frame of a nazi german.

Such a simple revelation of similarity between species powered multiple rights revolutions for beings that we originally thought to be “too different” or inferior to us. As Gay rights, Women’s rights, and Animal rights were born out of scientific logic and reasoning our moral arc began to increase. Shermer examines and defines the link between humanity and science by introducing the notion that we all come into this world with some sort of moral compass, inherently already knowing basic rights from wrongs. However, Shermer makes it clear that how we control our moral compass comes from how we are “nurtured”. The levels of guilt that we feel for violating certain social obligations can and will vary depending on the environment that we are raised in .This leads Shermer into introducing the most simple and effective way of measuring morality in an action. Shermer defines an action as being morally correct only if the action increases an individual’s chances of survival and flourishing. The idea is to stretch the boundaries of the moral sphere with the help of science and its tools of reason. He then goes on to state how we would not be as far as we are in the progression of morality today if …show more content…

Towards the end of Part I Michael goes into detail about how people tend to have a hard time accepting what they don 't understand. Science has proven that human beings have a hard time feeling empathy towards groups and people that are different from us .Which causes us to feel the need to exclude, punish, and even kill those who are different. In order to prevent this from shrinking the moral sphere we have to attempt to provide people with enough information so that they can better understand religions, ethnicities, and preferences that are different from their own to provide a better understanding of one another and unify all beings under a continuously growing moral arc. Despite the majority of people deriving their moral dos and don’ts from their religions, Shermer reveals why this isn’t a good idea. He informs the reader that religion cannot be the driver of moral progress because it is based on only showing morality to those who participate in the same religious beliefs. This exclusive attitude that religion seems to exude can be seen in one of the most significant items that laid that the very foundation for Christianity, the bible. The bible is widely known for its commandments that portray good morals and rules that

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