Analysis Of Barbara Carper's Patterns Of Knowing

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As I reflect on my nursing career, I am reminded of the skills that have allowed me to develop what I know in nursing. In Barbara A. Carper’s “Patterns of Knowing,” there are four necessary components which connect to know the whole of nursing. These patterns include Empirics, Esthetics, Ethics and personal knowledge. Through Carpers theory, nurses are able to reflect on scenarios that “provide pathways to which the fullness of a situation can be known” (Johns, 1995, p. 227). First, I would like to reflect on a scenario of a five year old boy brought to the E.R by police for evaluation. While assessing this child, I noticed bruising in the shape of a hand on his buttocks with various scratches and grab marks on his right arm. It was reported…show more content…
This time the grab marks were more obvious and the child’s arm had visible deformity. Again, the physician and I took multiple pictures, treated the child, and called necessary personnel. The child had to be transported to Children’s hospital for a broken arm and head injury. I found out confirmation that this child had been getting abused emotionally and physically by the mother’s boyfriend this whole time. After the child received treatment he has been placed with the grandma for temporary custody. In reference to Carpers patterns of knowing, the first characteristic is “Empirical knowledge,” or “the science of nursing” which leads to a hypothesis (McEwen & Wills, 2014, p. 13). This case had known evidence which I recorded as quantitate data. For example, I collected pictures, statements, and x-rays for the police and Children in Youth Services. When comparing the child’s story to data collected, I initially formed a hypothesis that the child was running away from an abusive…show more content…
14). When applying this to this scenario, I showed compassion by staying by this child’s side and holding his hand while he was in the E.R. I sensed the child’s fearfulness, hesitancy and flat affect. Though he did not make eye contact, I sensed the child felt he was feeling safe when he asked me to stay in the room with him. It was apparent that the child just wanted to be cared for and shown love, so I did my best under the circumstances. The third Pattern of Knowing is “personal knowledge,” which is termed as the “therapeutic use of self” including, engagement, participation and experience (McEwen & Wills, 2014, p. 14). I felt I had a connection with this child’s feelings being a victim of physical abuse myself. I tried to calm the child by treating his pain, attending to his wounds, holding his hand and wrapping him in blankets. I cleared the room of any medical supplies that could possibly add to this boy’s fear and anxiety. I did this because I knew from prior experiences that kids often connect seeing hospital supplies with
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