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Analysis Of A Job Was The Ticket Out Of Poverty By Barbara Ehrenreich

You know the economy is bad when a person is working 40 hours a week and they are still not making enough to get by and living in poverty. When there are more foreclosed and vacant homes, but an increase in the opening of motels and efficiencies. And recent college graduates are settling for mediocre jobs that do not require much skill. Yet, we brainwash them to obtain an education to avoid such occurrences. Who is to blame for the misfortune of such a vast amount of people? This is one of the questions Barbara Ehrenreich sought to answer as she went undercover to see if the wages the unskilled earn in certain jobs are livable. To begin, in researching and writing of her book, Ehrenreich’s main objective was to prove that due to the greed…show more content…
Poverty is perceived as something hard to get into, and easy to get out of. Not taking into account that some people are born into it generationally. Or, by thoroughly examining the economic and social conditions in which those people live. Hence, this is what Ehrenreich did throughout her entire book. First beginning with a recap of her childhood, and a discussion about how her family was borderline impoverished and that only until her father got a job as a miner, did her family escape to middle-class status (pg. 9). She then goes on to impose restrictions on herself to further solidify and to give her the most accurate experience of a working-class laborer. Rule one was that she could not, in her research for jobs, fall back on any skills derived from her education or usual work-not that there were a lot of want ads for essayist anyway. Rule two was that she had to take the highest paying job that was offered, and to do her best in holding on to it. Rule three was that she had to accept the cheapest accommodations that she could find, at least the cheapest that offered an acceptable level of safety and privacy (pg.…show more content…
While there, she first began staying in Motel 6 which charged $59 a night (having a bed, TV, a phone, and a really unrestricted view of Route 25) (pg.34). Only until she found a normal job and a home. So she begins the job and home search at the same time, and finds out that there are no apartments in Portland. Actually, there are plenty of condos and "executive apartments" for $1,000 a month or more, but the only low rent options seem to be clustered away in an area distant from her (pg. 30). However, she does find a semi-appealing place, the Blue Haven. For $120.00 a week she had a bed/living area with a kitchen growing off of it, linens included, and a TV that would have cable until the cable company notices that the former occupant is no longer paying the bill. Better yet the security deposit is only $100.00 which she produces on the spot (pg.36). But once moving in, she realized that her new home was smaller than she recalled. For one thing, the tool shed used by the motel corner take up part of her cottage space, and this leads to a certain unfortunate blending of biological functions. With the toilet less than four feet from the tiny kitchen table she has to close the bathroom door or she feel likes she is eating in a latrine, and the fact
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