An Overview of Doyle’s The Hound of the Baskervilles

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The Hound of the Baskervilles is a mystery novel with added superstition. Arthur Conan Doyle is the author of The Hound of the Baskervilles. In addition, he is the creator of the legendary Sherlock Holmes, and the Sherlock holms saga. The hound of Baskervilles was not originally supposed to be in the Holmes saga but because of society influence was changed to add Holmes into the mix. Furthermore, Holmes is a legion that Arthur Conan Doyle created that in turn was a success that out lived the author, Doyle. However, The Hound of the Baskervilles is said to be the best mystery novel of all time. Furthermore, it has elements of mystery that add suspense and keep the reader on edge. Arthur Conan Doyle wrote The Hound of the Baskervilles, creating Sherlock Holmes and provided points to overview.

Sherlock Holmes is a fictional character that is an excellent detective. The character Sherlock Holmes tends to analyze, preserve, and humiliate things around him.

Sherlock Holmes has the ability to analysis things around him that normally people would not notice. Holmes ability and skills of observation and the turn of the century scientific culture helps him solve the crime (Cranfield). Moreover, Holmes would use this unique skill to see things that could be used as evidence in a case. At the University of Edinburgh, Doyle discovered the muse for Sherlock Holmes. Dr. Joseph Bell had skill of diagnosing far beyond simple medical; he would study the character and detect certain clues in regard to the subject’s profession and habits. Furthermore, this made Dr. Bell a significant source of Sherlock Holmes unusual talents (Benstock). The book Quotes:” The world is full of obvious things which nobody by any chance ever observe” (Doyle 18). ...

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Doyle, Arthur C. The Hound of the Baskervilles. New York: Dover Publications, 1994. Print.

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Kissane, James, and John M. Kissane. "Sherlock Holmes and the Ritual of Reason." Nineteenth-Century Fiction 17.4 (1963): 353-362. Rpt. in Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism. Ed. Lawrence J. Trudeau. Vol. 287. Detroit: Gale, 2013. Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 14 Jan. 2014.

Rifelj, Carol. "‘Knowledge of Literature—Nil?’: Sherlock Holmes the Reader." Clues 18.2 (1997): 1-18. Rpt. in Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism. Ed. Lawrence J. Trudeau. Vol. 289. Detroit: Gale, 2014. Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 14 Jan

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