An Inspector Calls

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An Inspector Calls' is based in 1912, before the first and second world

war, before the sinking of the Titanic and before women had any rights.

An Inspector Calls

'An Inspector Calls' is based in 1912, before the first and second

world war, before the sinking of the Titanic and before women had any

rights. 'An Inspector Calls' was written in 1945, Britain was enduring

the final year of The Second World War and the country was united in

one community, together they were fighting for Britain.

JB Priestley liked what he saw; people were putting aside their class

and background and ignored their prejudices in an attempt to help

their country. The only problem was Priestley knew after the war, that

Britain may return to its previous state. Therefore Priestley wrote a

play, based in Edwardian Britain when class mattered and reputation

was everything. Priestley set the play in Brumley, an industrial town

where, like most places in Britain, the rich and poor rarely met. The

only places the two classes became more integrated were the bars where

prostitutes and rich men would meet. But these places were another

world, a form of escapism for family men yearning for more excitement,

they had double standards and these double standards appear throughout

the play. The story is about the Birling family and their involvement

with a young woman who tragically committed suicide, each member of

the family had their own input to her downward spiral, and it started

with Mr Birling.

'A man has to mind his own business and look after himself and his

own..' and it is with that there is knock at the door. Inspector

Goole enters the Birling household (and in my opinion acting as

Priestley's alter-ego), causing unrest amongst some of them and no

affect on others. The mood changes from a happy, celebratory

atmosphere to a tense and mysterious one. Maybe this could be shown in

a change of lighting, being more intense as apposed to before when the

family were rejoicing the fact of their daughter's engagement. When

the inspector begins to interrogate Mr Birling he refuses to accept

any responsibility for Eva Smith's death, he gives no thought to his

actions and this is obvious as he shows relatively little remorse or

guilt. However, Mr Birling has an honest approach to life, not ashamed

by his refusal to give Eva Smith a raise 'I refused of course,' and

seems surprised why anyone would query his actions. Money in this era

was a precious thing and all Eva Smith was to Mr Birling was a

problem, which must be rid off immediately, especially since it could

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