Among The Ash Heaps And Millionaires In The Great Gatsby

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“Among the Ash Heaps and Millionaires” In the famous great American novel, The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald, the main character Jay Gatsby is portrayed as a romantic hero, hopeful dreamer, and as someone who is completely unforgettable. What makes Gatsby so great was not his wealth, position in society or his personal belongings, but his determination to make something of himself during a time in which moral corruptions were common. Jay Gatsby’s personal greatness was exemplified in his struggle against his own fate, devoted love towards Daisy, and self sacrifice. Jay Gatsby grew up in a family where money was not an easy thing to come by, but he was determined to change his social standing. He worked hard and dedicated himself…show more content…
On the last page was printed the words ‘schedule’.” (Fitzgerald 181). Since Gatsby was young, he knew that he was destined for a greater life. He patiently waited for an opportunity to come along that he could grasp his hands upon. Because of his hard work and his deep desire to make something more of himself, he eventually distanced himself from his family which society considered “unsuccessful farm people” (Fitzgerald 43). To achieve his dream, he composed a schedule which contained many educational and physical activities. This shows from a young age that he was determined to become someone who was valued by society. His own father knew the reality of what his son wanted, when he said, “Jimmy was bound to get ahead. He always had some resolves like this or something” (Fitzgerald 173). His father recognized in his son what others did not have the chance to see, because Gatsby’s previous life was unrecognizable. Gatsby put on a…show more content…
Gatsby’s dream of winning Daisy has been deferred for long enough, that it seems impossible to everyone else around him. He pursues the past while he is in the future. He pines for Daisy after losing her to another man. Gatsby’s elaborate parties were all thrown in hopes that someday Daisy would wander inside. Nick finds out Gatsby’s intentions when he says, “Then it had not been merely the stars to which he has aspired on that June night. He became alive to me, delivered suddenly from the womb of his purposeless splendor” (Fitzgerald 83). All the extravagant spending, the house, the new identity, the illegal activities, were all for Daisy. He throws everything he has into this charade as he tries to adapt to Daisy’s world of high society. The problem is that Gatsby is so close, but yet so far away, “he stretched out his arms toward the dark water in a curious way... I glanced seaward- and distinguished nothing except a single green light, minute and far away, that might have been the end of a dock” (Fitzgerald 25). Gatsby tries to embrace the light that emits from the end of Daisy’s dock. The light is something that he cannot hold, just like he cannot hold Daisy Buchanan in his arms. He attempts to pursue his dream that is nothing more than an illusion. Despite being blinded with his infatuation with her, “He hadn’t once ceased looking at
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