American Political Parties

2259 Words10 Pages
Opening As a constitutional democracy, the United States of America prides itself on the rights of its citizens. These include the right to free speech, to bear arms, to practice religion, and so forth, but one of the most fundamental bases of a democracy is the right to vote. The ability to vote and decide on the country 's leaders is handled through a series of elections. One of the most important elections is the election of the President because he or she serves as the Chief Executive, Chief Legislator, Chief Diplomat, and Commander in Chief (Edwards, Wattenberg, and Lineberry 408-423). That is a serious amount of responsibility for one person, and unsurprisingly people want to make the correct decision. However, the road to the Presidency…show more content…
Political parties are the organisations that compete for offices in the political spectrum. Some countries have dozens of parties, each with their own candidates, philosophies, and agendas. In the US though, there are now two main political parties: the Republicans and the Democrats. Of course, there are sub-divisions, but they are the prominent ones. Especially in their earlier years, but even today, parties had and have a great amount of influence. “Up until the early twentieth century, American parties chose their candidates with little or no input from voters” (Edwards, Wattenberg, and Lineberry 260). Currently, the parties have nearly handed complete control of nominations to voters who identify as members of said party,…show more content…
It is used to close the gap between densely populated states and the states that have fewer voters, making the small states seem somewhat important. This can have imperfect consequences, even complete inequality. For example, in a study from 1963 run by John F. Banzhaf III of Villanova University it was found that, at the time, “ voter in New York State has 3.312 times the voting power of a citizen in another part of the country.” This has since shifted, at least slightly, because by my best calculations a voter in Wyoming has 3.516 times the voting power of a person from New York. I discovered this by dividing the number of electoral votes allocated by the population of the state at the time. According to the U.S. Census Bureau the population of New York in 2012 was 19.61 million people, while Wyoming had 576,893. The electoral votes at the time were 29 and 3, respectively (Edwards, Wattenberg, and Lineberry 318). Dividing these two sets of numbers and putting them in a ratio of Wyoming to New York shows us that Wyoming votes have 3.516 times the weight of those from New York. This is not equality. Certain voters should not have more of a say than others. This is just one example of how the use of the Electoral College has proliferated inequality in United States presidential
Open Document