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Allegory In Robert Frost's The Road Not Taken

“The Road Not Taken,” by Robert Frost emphasizes how uncertainty in life can lead to regret or disappointment in the future. After analyzing this poem; there is no road less traveled. However, “The Road Not Taken” displays choice, equality, and sorrow. Before diving into the text; “The Road Not Taken” is written by Robert Frost. Then, while looking over the poem; the form of the poem has an iambic pentameter. With this in mind, there are four stanzas of five lines. There are also four stressed syllables per line. A rhyme scheme is also intertwined throughout the poem. This rhyme scheme is an ABAAB pattern. Some examples of this rhyme are: ‘stood’ (line 3), ‘could’ (line 4) / ‘claim’ (line 7), ‘same’ (line 10) / ‘lay’, ‘day’, ‘way’ (lines…show more content…
This shows the allegorical aspect. All in all, these are some of the beneficial ideas to keep in mind while reading the poem. As for the analysis of the text, the first two lines of the poem show a metaphor for ‘choice’. This exemplifies the part of the poem where Frost mentions, “Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, and I’m sorry I could not travel both.” (Lines 1, 2) After reading this piece of the poem, it is certain that the speaker has to choose which path to take. Equally important, this line also shows the uncertainty of what path to choose. What will be at the end of each path? Which path is taken the most? The least? Why? Afterwards, another decision and metaphor are made in the second stanza, first line. This example is: “Then took the other, as just as fair.” (Line 6) This piece of the poem shows a sudden decision made to take a path. Likewise, it also shows the uncertainty of what the other path, as well as the path chosen will be…show more content…
If he loves it, he will most likely come back as he said to take the other path. On the other hand, if the speaker regrets the path chosen; he may either not want to come back to the other path; or come back in hopes it will be a better outcome. Provided that, these are some examples of where choice is found during the reading of “The Road Not Taken”. As for equality; both paths are equally worn in the poem. This is true because the end of the second stanza states, “Though as for that the passing there Had worn them really about the same.” (Lines 9, 10) These lines express that the paths have been used about the same. Also, at the beginning of the third stanza, “And both that morning equally lay In leaves no step had trodden back.” (Lines 11, 12) This line also shows that no road is less traveled, and both paths are equally worn; even though they may have different appearances. These lines also help to describe the uncertainty of the speaker’s
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