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All Eyes on Holly

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In Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Truman Capote, Holly Golightly’ s life isn’t directly told from her point of view, but her life is told by various people within the novel; as a result, this causes a difference between storytelling and point of view. Holly’s life is told from three character’s point of view within the novel. The difference between these points of views and storytelling will be revealed in this essay.

The narrator tells his experiences with Holly and her weaknesses and strengths from his point of view. He enjoys the company of Holly and will do practically anything for her. The Narrator reminds Holly of her brother Fred (20). The friendship between Holly and the Narrator is shown throughout the novel. The narrator has a positive view on how he portrays Holly. He often lets Holly use him to her advantage sometimes within the story, but the narrator has patience and understanding towards Holly. The main character telling the story is very passive when it comes to situations that revolve around Holly. The narrator is forced to acquiesce or give in to certain dilemmas that he encounters within the novel. One of the most important things to the narrator is Holly finding happiness regardless of the obstacles the narrator telling the story has to go through. The narrator and Holly can be seen as foil characters. The differences between the both of them help Holly and the Narrator get along quite well throughout the story. At times, they will disagree on certain topics, but overall Holly and the narrator have a good and steady relationship. Through the good and the bad, Holly and the narrator are still friends.

O.J. Berman views Holly as a fake and phony individual based on his interactions with her (30). He thinks that she ...

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...Criticism. Ed. Jelena O. Krstovic. Vol. 93. Detroit: Gale, 2006. Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 26 July 2010.

2. Capote, Truman. Breakfast at Tiffany’s. New York, NY: Randon House. 1958. Print

3. Dapos; Arcy, Chantal Cornut-Gentille. "Who's Afraid of the Femme Fatale in Breakfast at Tiffany's?: Exposure and Implications of a Myth." Gender, I-Deology: Essays on Theory, Fiction, and Film. Ed. Chantal Cornut-Gentille D'Arcy and José Angel García Landa. Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1996. 371-383. Rpt. in Short Story Criticism. Ed. Jelena O. Krstovic. Vol. 93. Detroit: Gale, 2006. Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 26 July 2010.

4. Pugh, Tison. "Capote's Breakfast at Tiffany's." The Explicator 61.1 (Fall 2002): 51-53. Rpt. in Short Story Criticism. Ed. Jelena O. Krstovic. Vol. 93. Detroit: Gale, 2006. Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 26 July 2010.